secession

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se·ces·sion

 (sĭ-sĕsh′ən)
n.
1. The act of seceding.
2. often Secession The withdrawal of 11 Southern states from the Union in 1860-1861, precipitating the US Civil War.

[Latin sēcessiō, sēcessiōn-, from sēcessus, past participle of sēcēdere, to secede; see secede.]

se·ces′sion·al adj.

secession

(sɪˈsɛʃən)
n
1. the act of seceding
2. (Historical Terms) (often capital) chiefly US the withdrawal in 1860–61 of 11 Southern states from the Union to form the Confederacy, precipitating the American Civil War
[C17: from Latin sēcessiō a withdrawing, from sēcēdere to secede]
seˈcessional adj
seˈcessionˌism n
seˈcessionist n, adj

se•ces•sion

(sɪˈsɛʃ ən)

n.
1. an act or instance of seceding.
2. (often cap.) the withdrawal from the Union of 11 southern states in the period 1860–61, which brought on the Civil War.
[1525–35; < Latin sēcessiō withdrawal]
se•ces′sion•al, adj.

Secession

 a body of seceders, 1600; secessionists collectively, 1862. Also, secesh.

Secession

The act of leaving the Union by any state.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.secession - an Austrian school of art and architecture parallel to the French art nouveau in the 1890s
school - a body of creative artists or writers or thinkers linked by a similar style or by similar teachers; "the Venetian school of painting"
art movement, artistic movement - a group of artists who agree on general principles
2.Secession - the withdrawal of eleven southern states from the Union in 1860 which precipitated the American Civil War
3.secession - formal separation from an alliance or federation
separation - the act of dividing or disconnecting
breakaway, breaking away - the act of breaking away or withdrawing from; "there was a breakaway by the discontented members"; "a breaking away from family and neighborhood"

secession

noun withdrawal, break, split, defection, seceding, apostasy, disaffiliation the Ukraine's secession from the Soviet Union
Translations

secession

[sɪˈseʃən] Nsecesión f, separación f (from de)

secession

[sɪˈsɛʃən] nsécession f

secession

nAbspaltung f; (US Hist) → Sezession f

secession

[sɪˈsɛʃn] n (frm) secession (from)secessione f (da)
References in classic literature ?
While his muscles were working lustily, his mind seemed as passive as a spectator at a diorama: scenes of the sad past, and probably sad future, floating before him and giving place one to the other in swift sucession.
This will be the fourth time in sucession that Westwood, who finished fourth in The Open at Royal Portrush, has played in Prague, with his highest finish - ninth - coming in 2017.
Collier LS, Kikuchi FY, Benicio LPF, Sousa SA (2011) Maize and jack beans intercropping and sucession as alternative for no-till system.
The sucession fund was established to keep ownership of businesses in Wales by enabling management teams to buy out owner-managers either looking to retire or realise a return from their equity stakes.
Spatial patchiness of litter, nutrients and macroinvertebrates during secondary sucession in a Tropical Montane Cloud Forest in Mexico.
Others do when their predecessor suddenly departs and the company has no sucession plan in place; they remain briefly while the Board looks for a more permanent successor.
SUCESSION POLITICSbrBeyond the regular legislator or governor mired in graft, however, another complication is in the war on corruption getting mired in succession politics.
Gary Woods made crucial saves in quick sucession om Martin Boyle and Paul Hanlon to keep Accies in it and that allowed Antonio Rojano to grab a point.