secession

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se·ces·sion

 (sĭ-sĕsh′ən)
n.
1. The act of seceding.
2. often Secession The withdrawal of 11 Southern states from the Union in 1860-1861, precipitating the US Civil War.

[Latin sēcessiō, sēcessiōn-, from sēcessus, past participle of sēcēdere, to secede; see secede.]

se·ces′sion·al adj.

secession

(sɪˈsɛʃən)
n
1. the act of seceding
2. (Historical Terms) (often capital) chiefly US the withdrawal in 1860–61 of 11 Southern states from the Union to form the Confederacy, precipitating the American Civil War
[C17: from Latin sēcessiō a withdrawing, from sēcēdere to secede]
seˈcessional adj
seˈcessionˌism n
seˈcessionist n, adj

se•ces•sion

(sɪˈsɛʃ ən)

n.
1. an act or instance of seceding.
2. (often cap.) the withdrawal from the Union of 11 southern states in the period 1860–61, which brought on the Civil War.
[1525–35; < Latin sēcessiō withdrawal]
se•ces′sion•al, adj.

Secession

 a body of seceders, 1600; secessionists collectively, 1862. Also, secesh.

Secession

The act of leaving the Union by any state.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.secession - an Austrian school of art and architecture parallel to the French art nouveau in the 1890s
school - a body of creative artists or writers or thinkers linked by a similar style or by similar teachers; "the Venetian school of painting"
art movement, artistic movement - a group of artists who agree on general principles
2.Secession - the withdrawal of eleven southern states from the Union in 1860 which precipitated the American Civil War
3.secession - formal separation from an alliance or federation
separation - the act of dividing or disconnecting
breakaway, breaking away - the act of breaking away or withdrawing from; "there was a breakaway by the discontented members"; "a breaking away from family and neighborhood"

secession

noun withdrawal, break, split, defection, seceding, apostasy, disaffiliation the Ukraine's secession from the Soviet Union
Translations

secession

[sɪˈseʃən] Nsecesión f, separación f (from de)

secession

[sɪˈsɛʃən] nsécession f

secession

nAbspaltung f; (US Hist) → Sezession f

secession

[sɪˈsɛʃn] n (frm) secession (from)secessione f (da)
References in classic literature ?
While his muscles were working lustily, his mind seemed as passive as a spectator at a diorama: scenes of the sad past, and probably sad future, floating before him and giving place one to the other in swift sucession.
Gary Woods made crucial saves in quick sucession om Martin Boyle and Paul Hanlon to keep Accies in it and that allowed Antonio Rojano to grab a point.
it is precisely because Spain's empire remained so large and attactive that the European powers fought the War of Spanish Sucession, the 'Great War ' of the early eighteen century.
Earthworms are also important agents in the distribution of VAM fungi thereby influencing plant establishment in early sucession.
Por razoes desconhecidas, havia escrito boa parte, se nao a totalidade do livro em frances e planejava publica-lo em Paris em 2 volumes: La sucession portugaise (1826-1828) e L'Empire et le Roi (1828-31), fechando a periodizacao na "fase militar" da sucessao do trono portugues, modalidade para a qual, confessava, nao possuia "nem gosto, nem competencia" (Fernbrook, 16/8/1924).
As Valentine (the wonderfully elegant Tom Turner, who seems made for the part) pursues the elegant Angelica (the equally gifted Justine Mitchell) he finds his penniless state a nuisance His rakish valet Jeremy (Carl Prekopp) fobs off suitors and outraged fathers, professional scandal-mongers and city philosophers, while Valentine, in a sucession of outrageous postures and a gorgeous peacock-blue satin suit, sees his inheritance passing into the hands of his brother Tom, a seafaring type whose view of the world leaves his parent a little more soothed.
1994): The last stages of dinosaur faunal history in Europe: A sucession of Maastrichtian dinosaur assemblages from the Corbieres (southern France).