Sudanic


Related to Sudanic: Songhai

Sudanic

(suːˈdænɪk)
n
(Languages) a group of languages spoken in scattered areas of the Sudan, most of which are now generally assigned to the Chari-Nile branch of the Nilo-Saharan family
adj
1. (Languages) relating to or belonging to this group of languages
2. (Placename) of or relating to the Sudan
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Languages: French, native African languages belonging to the Sudanic family
However, this is well established throughout all of Sudanic Arabic, and occurs sporadically under various conditions elsewhere (e.
The book first places Africa in the context of world history at the opening of the seventh century before examining the general impact of Islamic penetration; the continuing expansion of the Bantu-speaking peoples; and the growth of civilizations in the Sudanic zones of West Africa.
Many lingua-ethnic groups that settled in northern Uganda including Central Sudanic peoples, Nilo-Hamites and the Riverlake Nilotics such as the Lwo.
South Sudan is a big family of 62 tribes or originally into Nilotic, Bantu and Sudanic groups with great diversity.
His histories of the southern Sahara also shed light on the empires of Ghana, Mall, Timbuktu, the Songhai, and the Sudanic empire of Kanem, showing how each created local perspectives that interacted with Western lust for adventure, mercantilism, and (as ill-conceived as it was) humanitarianism.
Edwards argues that contemporary archaeologists and Egyptologists still remain reluctant to acknowledge the Sudanic roots of Nubian culture, preferring to see it as an offshoot, or as influenced by Egyptian culture.
Herdsmen in the Sudanic and Sahelian zones raise cattle, sheep, goats, and, among the non-Muslims, a few pigs.
Chapter 1, "Fiddling in West Africa: Understanding the Culture Area," outlines a history of Sudanic West Africa and presents the historical and linguistic complexities of this very large geographical region, DjeDje hints at the controversy of one-string fiddle origin very early in the text in a section, "Arabization and Islamization" (p.
Harrow (2000: 520) demonstrated that the connections between north Africa and the Sudanic belt have been multiple and this has been borne out by the historical chronicles such as Ta'rikh as-Sudan which was written by Abdur-Rahman As-Sa'idi (d.
Black Crescent also sheds information on Muslims in Sahara and Sub-Saharan Africa when Africa had the great western Sudanic kingdoms of Ghana, Mali, and Songhay, from the 9th century to the 15th.