Sudanic

Related to Sudanic: Songhai

Sudanic

(suːˈdænɪk)
n
(Languages) a group of languages spoken in scattered areas of the Sudan, most of which are now generally assigned to the Chari-Nile branch of the Nilo-Saharan family
adj
1. (Languages) relating to or belonging to this group of languages
2. (Placename) of or relating to the Sudan
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References in periodicals archive ?
(2001) 'Photography and African studies', Sudanic Africa 12:179-81.
Albeit, anarchy in Sudan will have deleterious effects on the stability of the whole Sudanic belt, not just the Sudanese nation.
According to the Columbia (University) History of the World, three thousand years ago much of Africa was thinly populated with the exception of the "Sudanic belt stretching across the continent from the Atlantic Ocean to the Ethiopian plateau." In this region the inhabitants were technologically superior to the southern neighbours who remained hunter-gatherers while they had domesticated native cereals and rice.
Viktor, director of the Center of Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies, University of Bergen, Norway, is editor of Sudanic Africa: A Journal of Historical Sources.
Blood, "Paper in Sudanic Africa," in The Meaning of Timbuktu, ed.
Doubt, Scholarship and Society in 17th Century Central Sudanic Africa
Languages: French, native African languages belonging to the Sudanic family
However, this is well established throughout all of Sudanic Arabic, and occurs sporadically under various conditions elsewhere (e.g., Eastern Libyan Arabic).
(78.) See Wickens and Lowe 2008, Appendix I--Vernacular names, 1.2.2 Nilo-Saharan phylum, Eastern Sudanic, Eastern, Nubian, p.
(35) "K[oman] is one of the 'small' language families of the Ethio-Sudanese border area, belonging to Nilo-Saharan, probably within a larger 'core' grouping which includes East Sudanic, Gumuz (exclusive to Ethiopia), and the Kadu languages [...].There are five distinct K[oman] languages: Twampa (usually known as Uduk), Komo, Opuuo, Kwama and Gule." (Bender, 2007:416-417).
Masonen credits the linkage of regionalized Sudanic trade networks with the Mediterranean to Arabic traders and the introduction of the dromedary to the Sahara.