sudarium


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sudarium

(sjʊˈdɛərɪəm)
n, pl -daria (-ˈdɛərɪə)
(Historical Terms) another word for sudatorium, veronica2
[C17: from Latin, from sūdāre to sweat]

sudarium

1. a cloth or handkerchief for wiping sweat from the face.
2. a sudatorium.
See also: Cleanliness
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References in periodicals archive ?
Witnesses to Mystery: Investigations Into Christ's Relics" by Grzegorz Gorny and Janusz Rosikon is a beautifully and profusely illustrated, 336 page compendium deftly organized into chapters on The Turin Shroud; The True Cross; The Holy Nails; The Sudarium of Oviedo; The Tunic of Argenteuil; The Holy Coat of Trier; The Veil of Manoppello; The Pillar of Scourging; The Crown of Thorns.
For what the Augustinian legacy of visual relations found in the object, whether shroud or sudarium, head of St.
Additional evidence of the Shroud's authenticity comes from the recent research on the Sudarium of Oviedo, an ancient, bloodstained, linen cloth the size of a small towel that is claimed by tradition to have covered the head of Jesus after his crucifixion.
The Sudarium is severely soiled and crumpled, with dark flecks that are symmetrically arranged but, unlike the markings on the Shroud of Turin, form no image.
According to the exhibit wall text, the sudarium (from the Latin "sweat"), which shows Christ's head imprinted on the cloth that wiped his face, is an "acheiropoieton," or a work "not made by human hands.
Further, pollen found on the Shroud matches that found on the Sudarium of Oviedo.
This derives from Western art and relates to an etching entitled Head of Christ on the Sudarium (1649) by the 17th century French artist Claude Mellan (Figs 3 and 4).
The Sudarium is believed to have been used to cover Jesus's head after he died and, unlike the shroud, its history has been traced back to the first century.
If by the late sixteenth century the holy sudarium of the Visitatio Sepulchri and the miracle-working Host of the Croxton Play of the Sacrament were long in the past, historical evidence suggests that many ordinary folk dung to their "magical" bits of cloth despite the inroads made by the reformed religion.
With Veronica's sudarium inaccessible in Rome, quite varied representations of it, each claiming its own veracity, circulated widely.
Bonaffini's work convincingly retrieves certain Latinate words forgotten in English: "The silvery eye / appeared promptly / in the heat, filled with wonder and tedium, / it sought him in his insomnia, / it entered his sudarium.
The image of Christ that he proudly displays is the sudarium or Veil of Veronica.