Suetonius


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Related to Suetonius: Tacitus, Suetonius Paulinus

Sue·to·ni·us

 (swē-tō′nē-əs) Full name Gaius Suetonius Tranquillus. fl. second century ad.
Roman historian whose major work, Lives of the Caesars, is an account of the lives of the first 12 Roman emperors.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Suetonius

(swiːˈtəʊnɪəs)
n
(Biography) full name Gaius Suetonius Tranquillus. 75–150 ad, Roman biographer and historian, whose chief works were Concerning Illustrious Men and The Lives of the Caesars (from Julius Caesar to Domitian)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Sue•to•ni•us

(swɪˈtoʊ ni əs)

n.
(Gaius Suetonius Tranquillus) A.D. 75–150, Roman historian.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations

Suetonius

[swiːˈtəʊnɪəs] NSuetonio
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

Suetonius

nSueton(ius) m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
if the man that murdered Mr Derby was now present!" manifesting in this a more seared and callous conscience than even Nero himself; of whom we are told by Suetonius, "that the consciousness of his guilt, after the death of his mother, became immediately intolerable, and so continued; nor could all the congratulations of the soldiers, of the senate, and the people, allay the horrors of his conscience."
There's another side too that could be an interesting refresher in a Roman-era historical lesson, if you have read Suetonius that is.
According to Roman historian Suetonius, writing in the Lives Of The 12 Caesars, Caligula indeed planned to make Incitatus a consul.
Peter has also visited numerous Roman sites, both in the UK and in Europe and has used original Roman historical sources of Tacitus, Suetonius and Dio, Google Maps for distancing and location, Wikipedia and several archaeological online sources.
He addresses all aspects of Caligula's life as a conductor of Roman foreign policy and military operations through the sources by ancient writers who reference his reign, such as Suetonius, Dio Cassius, Tacitus, Josephus, Philo, Seneca the Younger, and Pliny the Elder, with commentary on the sources, points of dispute, and further research.
Whoever guided the creation of the tazze had an intimate knowledge of Suetonius's De Vita Caesarum, or Lives of the Caesars, and set out to create a carefully edited visual version of it.
Suetonius, the Roman historian, recounted how Caligula's boats had"sterns set with gems, parti-coloured sails, huge spacious baths, colonnades and banquet halls, and even a great variety of vines and fruit trees." Romans initially accepted Caligula's luxurious tastes, perhaps intrigued by them.
It is more likely, though, that Mussolini's codex aimed to provide future historians with a source that might differ from the systematic denigration of the regime that, as Tacitus and Suetonius witness and the Duce knew, is typical post mortem dictatoris; indeed, Fascism did not express any doctrine comparable to the Nazi "Tausendjahriges Reich." Similarly, Augustus left his Res gestae, which have become a fundamental historical source to outline the positive aspects of his life and rule.
The site at Parsons Hill where Boudicca may have been buried fits many of the facts known about the scene of the showdown between Suetonius Paulinus and his 10,000 troops and the 200,000 rebels led by Boudicca.
Suetonius opened at 3.8 in the photo betting, but was backed to 1.44 before being announced the winner and the verdict stung supporters of the runner-up who had gone in at a low of 1.03.
But led by ruthless general Suetonius Paulinus, they managed to cross the Strait where they embarked upon a savage attack, sparing neither women nor children.