soft drink

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soft drink

n.
1. A nonalcoholic, flavored, carbonated beverage, usually commercially prepared and sold in bottles or cans.
2. A serving of this beverage. In both senses also called soda pop; also called regionally cold drink, drink, pop1, soda, soda water, tonic. See Note at tonic.

soft drink

n
(Cookery) a nonalcoholic drink, usually cold

soft′ drink′


n.
a beverage that is not alcoholic or intoxicating and is usu. carbonated, as root beer or ginger ale.
[1875–80]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.soft drink - nonalcoholic beverage (usually carbonated)soft drink - nonalcoholic beverage (usually carbonated)
beverage, drinkable, potable, drink - any liquid suitable for drinking; "may I take your beverage order?"
soda pop, soda water, tonic, pop, soda - a sweet drink containing carbonated water and flavoring; "in New England they call sodas tonics"
birch beer - carbonated drink containing an extract from bark of birch trees
bitter lemon - tart lemon-flavored carbonated drink
cola, dope - carbonated drink flavored with extract from kola nuts (`dope' is a southernism in the United States)
cream soda - sweet carbonated drink flavored with vanilla
egg cream - made of milk and flavored syrup with soda water
ginger ale, ginger pop - ginger-flavored carbonated drink
orange soda - orange-flavored carbonated drink
phosphate - carbonated drink with fruit syrup and a little phosphoric acid
root beer - carbonated drink containing extracts of roots and herbs
sarsaparilla - carbonated drink flavored with an extract from sarsaparilla root or with birch oil and sassafras
quinine water, tonic, tonic water - lime- or lemon-flavored carbonated water containing quinine
Translations
nealkoholický nápoj
læskedrik
refrescobebida no alcohólica
virvoitusjuoma
bezalkoholno piće
ソフトドリンク
청량 음료
nealkoholický nápoj
brezalkoholna pijača
alkoholfri dryck
เครื่องดื่มซึ่งไม่ใช่เหล้า
đồ uống không có cồn

soft drink

nbibita analcolica

soft drink

مَشْرُوبٌ غَيرُ كُحُولِيّ nealkoholický nápoj læskedrik alkoholfreies Getränk αναψυκτικό refresco virvoitusjuoma boisson non alcoolisée bezalkoholno piće bibita analcolica ソフトドリンク 청량 음료 frisdrank leskedrikk napój bezalkoholowy refrigerante безалкогольный напиток alkoholfri dryck เครื่องดื่มซึ่งไม่ใช่เหล้า meşrubat đồ uống không có cồn 软饮料

soft drink

n refresco
References in periodicals archive ?
FRUIT JUICES AND SUGARY DRINKS INCREASE CANCER RISK, SAYS STUDY DRINKING around one can of sugary drink or 100% fruit juice per day could increase risk of cancer, research suggests.
Apart from over-exerting himself and not listening to his body, Rajiv, instead of consuming more water, took a few sips of water followed by a sugary drink, which proved fatal as it messed up his electrolyte balance.
While cautious interpretation is needed, the findings add to a growing body of evidence indicating that limiting sugary drink consumption, together with taxation and marketing restrictions, might contribute to a reduction in cancer cases.
LESS than a can of sugary drink per day is enough to increase your risk of all cancers by 18 per cent, a major study has found.
Study Author Dr Bernard Srour said: "Limiting sugary drink consumption might contribute to a reduction in cancer cases."
The research, published in a medical journal called (https://www.bmj.com/content/366/bmj.l2408) BMJ on Wednesday, stated that a glass or 100 ml of sugary drink everyday can increase the risk of developing cancer by 18 percent.
"These data support the relevance of existing nutritional recommendations to limit sugary drink consumption, including 100 percent fruit juice, as well as policy actions, such as taxation and marketing restrictions targeting sugary drinks, which might potentially contribute to the reduction of cancer incidence," the authors write.
The researchers found that replacing a sugary drink with an
Research studies funded by the sugary drinks industry are significantly less likely than those without such ties to find links between sugary drink consumption and diabetes and obesity, according to a literature review published recently in Annals of Internal Medicine.
Interestingly, all sugary drink taxes, whether in France, Hungary, Mexico, or Chile, are sales taxes; they lead directly to point-of-sale price increases, often in proportion to the volume of the drink.
Recent polls show that a sugary drink tax is backed by the majority of the public with 55 percent supporting the measure and only 36 percent opposed.
Parents' beliefs about the healthfulness of sugary drink options: opportunities to address misperceptions.