parasuicide

(redirected from Suicidal gesture)
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Related to Suicidal gesture: Parasuicide

parasuicide

(ˌpærəˈsuːɪˌsaɪd)
n
1. (Pathology) the deliberate infliction of injury on oneself or the taking of a drug overdose as an attempt at suicide which may not be intended to be successful
2. (Pathology) a person who commits such an act
Translations

parasuicide

[ˌpærəˈsʊɪsaɪd] Nparasuicidio m
References in periodicals archive ?
(2) A suicidal act that does not end in death is commonly called a suicide attempt or a suicidal gesture. (3) Nevertheless, it is equally important as it could indicate distress of the individual, a risk of repetition of the act, and, importantly, a chance for intervention.
The suicidal gesture actually is an appeal to the others; lack of affection or the wish for love turn this game with death into a defence against others.
The narrated drama of the victim's life results, on the one hand, in the misconception that the suicidal gesture was the only acceptable solution to that person's problems and, on the other, in copycat behavioral patterns.
Our superior technology and firepower made any such encounter a suicidal gesture.
Sampaio (1991) even suggested that the suicidal gesture is a paradoxical attempt to change family relationships.
The program is also planned to include a volunteer speaker who has survived a suicidal gesture and their portrayal of what led to their decision to attempt suicide.
But all that followed a long period of depression after her son, James Tower, who served in Bosnia and in Iraq, died in 2003 at age 22 in what she now accepts as a suicidal gesture attributed to post-traumatic stress disorder.
Across the play, Tom, Millie, Ian, and Lawrence try to unearth what is at stake in FitzRoy's suicidal gesture. How can a man of faith like FitzRoy even contemplate suicide?
This kind of instant notoriety can be bought by suicidal gesture right now in the Bridgend area.
researchers challeged the view among clinicians that self-injurious behaviour is not a suicidal gesture and that it does not require a suicide assessment follow-up.
Patients who were suicidal or had a history of suicidal gesture were excluded from the review, because some testing, such as toxicology, would always have to be done of those patients for reasons other than to exclude medical illness.