Sun Zi


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Sun Zi

 (so͞on′ tsŭ′)
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There is a pleasing surface symmetry to the distinction Cohen makes between China as the strategic descendant of Sun Zi and the United States as the strategic descendant of Carl von Clausewitz, for example.
In addition, the application of Chinese military philosophy, especially Sun Zi's The Art of War, to modern leadership style has always been popular in management (e.g.
According to Griffith (1963), among all of the military philosophers in the West and East, Clausewitz is the only one who can be said to be comparable to Sun Zi. However, Sun Zi has a "clearer vision, more profound insight, and eternal freshness" (p.
But it supposedly has deep roots: according to Pillsbury Chinese military planners find inspiration in the classical past of Sun Zi and other ancient strategists.
There is a great irony about invoking some sort of Oriental military tradition, harking back to Sun Zi. For it was American strategic thought, as it developed after the Vietnam War, that took a Sun Zi-like form, with the emphasis on targeting the decision making of the enemy and the search for swift victory.
The categories themselves are so abstractly defined that it is sometimes unclear what they exclude or precisely how they are differentiated (e.g., is Sun Zi a member of the accommodationists?
(2001) mention the relationship between Chinese military thoughts, especially Sun Zi's book of The Art of War, and propaganda studies; according to them, "wartime propaganda can be traced back to The Art of War" (p.
According to Niou (2003), when the ancient Chinese developed systematic thought about warfare is hard to confirm, but Sun Zi was probably the first person to use the term "military philosophy." In The Art of War, Sun Zi presents the central ideological system of military philosophy and analyzes every possible factor in each of the thirteen chapters of the factors that may influence the result of a war.