supercontinent

(redirected from Supercontinents)
Also found in: Encyclopedia.

su·per·con·ti·nent

 (so͞o′pər-kŏn′tə-nənt)
n.
A large continent that, according to the theory of plate tectonics, broke up into smaller continents. Gondwana and Laurasia were supercontinents.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

supercontinent

(ˈsuːpəˌkɒntɪnənt)
n
(Geological Science) a great landmass thought to have existed in the geological past and to have split into smaller landmasses, which drifted and formed the present continents
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

su·per·con·ti·nent

(so͞o′pər-kŏn′tə-nənt)
A large continent that, according to the theory of plate tectonics, is thought to have split into smaller continents in the geologic past. Pangaea and Gondwanaland are supercontinents. See Note at Gondwanaland.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
supercontinent
References in periodicals archive ?
This has suggested that when the earth was divided into two supercontinents, Laurasia and Gondwana, thyreophorans were more common and diverse in Laurasia.
For most of the time, the tides are less energetic than they are today and, over the 400-600 million years between the formations of the two supercontinents, the tides are only large for 50 million years in total.
At some points in Earth's history, there has been only one large landmass or two, called supercontinents. Before the supercontinents that eventually split up into the present-day configuration, there was a supercontinent called Nuna.
A recent research suggests that breakup of supercontinents, drastic changes in Earth's atmospheric makeup, and the creation of life might have happened due to action of plate tectonics that led to water-containing minerals seep down deep enough to meet the Earth's iron core.
Over time several "supercontinents," or the largest landmasses of a given time period formed.
MT: What role does the cyclical creation and breakup of the supercontinents play in Earth's geological processes?
The large-scale geological processes that split the supercontinents into the ones we are familiar with today, for example, are elaborated through a participatory puzzle that allows users to re-align the drifting continents using in-house iPads and a communal screen.
It then switches from ecology to review Earth's history, from the origin of life, through the formation and breakup of supercontinents Rodinia and Pangaea (incorrectly called Rodinia on p.
Recent research suggests that supercontinents came together and cracked apart at least twice during this lengthy period.
Palaeoproterozoic supercontinents and global evolution.