supergiant

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Related to Supergiant stars: Blue-white supergiant

su·per·gi·ant

 (so͞o′pər-jī′ənt)
n.
Any of various very massive, large, and bright stars, such as Betelgeuse or Rigel, having a luminosity that is thousands of times greater than that of the sun. When a supergiant collapses into a supernova, it may result in either a neutron star or a black hole.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

supergiant

(ˈsuːpəˌdʒaɪənt)
n
(Astronomy) any of a class of extremely large and luminous stars, such as Betelgeuse, which have expanded to a large diameter and are eventually likely to explode as supernovae. Compare giant star, white dwarf
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

su•per•gi•ant

(ˈsu pərˌdʒaɪ ənt)

n.
a very bright, very large star, hundreds of times larger than the sun.
[1925–30]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

su·per·gi·ant

(so͞o′pər-jī′ənt)
A star that is larger, brighter, and more massive than a giant star. Supergiants, such as Betelgeuse or Rigel, are thousands of times brighter than the sun. See more at star.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.supergiant - an extremely bright star of very large diameter and low density
star - (astronomy) a celestial body of hot gases that radiates energy derived from thermonuclear reactions in the interior
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
"The discovery of waves in so many blue supergiant stars was a eureka moment," says postdoctoral researcher Dominic Bowman who is the corresponding author for this study: "The flicker in these stars had been there all along, we only had to wait for modern space telescopes to be able to observe them.
During the observation, they witnessed supernovae from different red supergiant stars - extremely big stellar bodies in final stages of their lives- in hopes of studying their shock breakouts or the initial flash that occurs before the main stellar explosion.
Today, many powerful instruments in orbit can help us track the denouements of such supergiant stars across a far wider swath of the electromagnetic spectrum.
Both Rigel and Betelgeuse are supergiant stars - gigantic nuclear furnaces and among the largest stars in the galaxy.
Washington, April 17 ( ANI ): Two international teams of astronomers studying long-lasting gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have concluded that they likely arose from the catastrophic death of supergiant stars hundreds of times larger than the Sun.
Both of these are supergiant stars thousands of times more luminous than our own mild Sun.
For example, young supergiant stars and ionized hydrogen gas in the galaxy's interstellar medium also produce intense infrared emissions.
The Sun has about two million convective cells that are typically 2,000 kilometers across, but theorists believe giant and supergiant stars should only have a few large convective cells because of their low surface gravity.
KSN 2011a and KSN 2011d were two massive red supergiant stars that died approximately 700 million and 1.2 billion years ago respectively.