supernational

(redirected from Supernationalism)

supernational

(ˌsuːpəˈnæʃnəl)
adj
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a less common word for supranational
ˌsuperˈnationalism n
ˌsuperˈnationalist n
ˌsuperˈnationally adv

su•per•na•tion•al

(ˌsu pərˈnæʃ ə nl)

adj.
tending to involve, or extending authority over, more than one nation; international.
[1910–15]
su`per•na′tion•al•ism, n.
su`per•na′tion•al•ly, adv.
Translations
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References in periodicals archive ?
Most significantly, if national attachments have not been replaced by a cosmopolitan outlook, it could mean that the EU represents an expanded form of nationalism, or "Euro-nationalism." (6) In Edgar Grande's terms, "supranationalism bears the risk of degenerating into a European supernationalism." (7)
This, however, would strengthen the argument as a sort of "European supernationalism," (54) which only includes identities that fit the European identity (however it might be defined at a given point in time and context).
The world is full of such demagogues, who build a career on hatred, supernationalism and racism.
The second section of the book is a selection of case studies that could easily be read as stand-alone guides to China, terrorism, European supernationalism, Russia and Africa.
And yet, in his correspondence with Maragall, the Basque language insists as a "problem" for Iberianism as well as for the quite varied formations known as cosmopolitanism, internationalism, supernationalism, and universalism.
(8.) Supernationalism is a Nietzschean formation expounded by Pompeius Gener and others; see Gener's "Supernacionals!" and "Els supernacionals de Catalunya;" see also Epps' "Before Post-nationalism."
A rise in aggressive, anti-Japanese supernationalism in China could convince Tokyo to abandon its hedging policies.
In Italy, Benito Mussolini imitated Hitler and whipped the Italians into frenzies of supernationalism. On the other side of the world, Japanese extreme nationalism led to the conquest of east Asia.
Pfitzner's anti-Semitism was more of a fearful antiinternationalism, a "supernationalism" as Mann noted in his Betrachtungen.