superprofit


Also found in: Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

superprofit

(ˌsuːpəˈprɒfɪt)
n
(Accounting & Book-keeping) above-average profits gained through enterprise
References in periodicals archive ?
London, Sept 1(ANI): A businessman made a superprofit of 100,000 pounds when he sold off his rare Ferrari, which he never even drove.
When marketeers come up with an idea, accountants should help them to analyse where the superprofit (the excess return generated by the value of the product's competitive advantage) will come from, how sustainable this is and what barriers to entry and exit exist in that market.
This scenario involves a fictitious supermarket chain, SuperProfit Foods; a fictitious manufacturer, Debonair Inc.; and a category, shampoo.
Furthermore, it is a stern warning against large-scale and foreign mining companies that not only exploit our non-renewable resources but also victimize our people in the name of superprofit,' Sanchez said.
Indeed, it is difficult to reconcile a pattern in which these firms, with annual global 'superprofits' of up to 30pc, reported 5-7pc profits in countries with standard corporate tax rates, versus much higher profits in low-tax jurisdictions with smaller markets for their drugs.
Despite the fact that we once again reveal new irresponsible hoteliers who want to get superprofits to the detriment of the image of the country and their own business reputation, we have corrected and adjusted the prices of 120 hotels that previously violated the requirements of Resolution No.
'We're going to be swamped with rapacious transnational corportations out to make superprofits and not to serve the public.'
On one side, black populations are ruthlessly exploited to deliver superprofits necessary for imperial adventures.
Pour rappel, la loi sur les hydrocarbures en vigueur a introduit un systeme d'ecremage des superprofits applicable aux beneficiaires du taux reduit de l'Impot complementaire sur le resultat (ICR).
Commodity-money relations developing in the XIV century in northern Italy generated trade and political competition of two Italian cities, and their fight for superprofits of "Oversea trade" defined the appearance of Italian merchants, missionaries and pirates in the Near East, the Caucasus and on the Caspian Sea.
No, not to justify the data caps, but to help everyone understand the lengths telcos go to to squeeze superprofits from end-users, and the kind of Internet access we need and want.
Today's high-tech civilization is perfectly compatible with parasitic elites of strikingly different kinds--from royal autocrats like the Saudis to African generals who loot their post-colonial countries to China's kleptocratic communist "princelings." Even formally liberal democracies like the United States are increasingly dominated by the rentiers of too-big-to-fail finance and tech tycoons who, having once invented something useful, then try to milk superprofits indefinitely thanks to government-created intellectual property rents.