suppletory

suppletory

(ˈsʌplɪtərɪ; -trɪ)
adj
archaic remedying deficiencies; supplementary
ˈsuppletorily adv

sup•ple•to•ry

(ˈsʌp lɪˌtɔr i, -ˌtoʊr i)

adj.
supplying a deficiency.
[1620–30; < Late Latin supplētōrius=supplē(re) + -tōrius -tory1]
Translations
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References in periodicals archive ?
The law contains provisions of the Data Privacy Act of 2013 to have suppletory effect.
The provisions of the Data Pivacy Act of 2012 shall also have suppletory effect for this purpose.
"There is nothing in said law allowing the suppletory application of its provisions to crimes punished under special penal laws," the prosecution countered.
'The Rules of Court, which is suppletory to impeachment rules, requires that allegations in a pleading must be based on the complainant's personal knowledge or authentic documents,' he said.
Allan Farnsworth favors, "suppletory."(56) The legislature may set a default, but only so long as it is disclaimable.(57) In other words, Volokh reads the First Amendment as requiring that parties be permitted to disclaim any requirement of confidentiality that the law obliges.
Norris never wavers from this view, returning to it one hundred pages later: "I look upon Grace as the Suppletory of corrupt Nature, and a Remedy against Original Sin, and a Counterpoise to the weight of that evil Concupiscence which dwells in us, and so to bear date since the fall, as being the Purchase and Procurement of the Mediatour" (162).