supply-side economics

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supply-side economics

n
(Economics) (functioning as singular) a school of economic thought that emphasizes the importance to a strong economy of policies that remove impediments to supply
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

supply-side economics

Economic policies based on the idea that a national economy will benefit through a government making more money available for investment, especially through reducing tax levels.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.supply-side economics - the school of economic theory that stresses the costs of production as a means of stimulating the economy; advocates policies that raise capital and labor output by increasing the incentive to produce
economic science, economics, political economy - the branch of social science that deals with the production and distribution and consumption of goods and services and their management
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References in periodicals archive ?
Given these significant federal tax cuts for the wealthy have been in place for 40 years, if supply-side theory worked in practice, the economy would have taken off.
The economics debate then turned to the Laffer curve, a new supply-side theory showing the relationship between tax rates and tax revenue.
But while Trump ran as a populist, he has governed as a plutocrat, most recently by endorsing the discredited supply-side theory of taxation that most Republicans still cling to.
There's just one flaw in the supply-side theory: The problem isn't 'supply' or a lack of 'investment' -- corporations are sitting on about $2 trillion in cash -- two trillion smackeroos -- and there are plenty of investment funds with capital.
Or consider Kristol's two essays on supply-side theory, 1977'S "Toward a 'New' Economics?" and 1981's "Ideology and Supply-Side Economics." Not content simply to defend the supply-side idea against its critics, he expends as many words explaining the historical genesis of the position as he does arguing for its merits.
The supply-side theory is consistent with the fluid and diverse American religious life that the Pew survey found.