surplus value

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surplus value

n.
The difference between the value of the product produced by labor and the actual price of labor as paid out in wages in Marxian analysis of capitalism.
Translations
mais-valia
References in periodicals archive ?
This involves measures by corporations to widen the difference between socially necessary labour-time and surplus labour-time in order to raise the rate of surplus-value, by means of absolute surplus-value based on low wages and extended working hours and by relative surplus-value based on labour productivity.
Situated in the context of the cycle of production, Marx (1867/1967) notes that, 'a part of the surplus-value turned into additional capital must always be re-transformed into variable capital, or additional labor fund' (613).
The more the capitalist structure encourages homo economicus to walk the existential tightrope, the more it will extract from them in surplus-value.
He was cognizant of Marx's (1976b, 313) countless indications that: "In the chapters on the production of surplus-value it was constantly presupposed that wages are at least equal to the value of labour-power.
He said: 'All economists share the error of examining surplus-value not as such, in its pure form, but in the particular forms of profit and rent.
This leads her to a claim that will astonish (and possibly be too quickly dismissed by) some feminists: "I believe that Marx not only includes women in his story of surplus-value, but makes that inclusion into the crux of the process.
Surplus-labor is therefore the source of profit, since surplus-value results from the extra labor that the capitalist appropriates.
Karl Marx called it use-value, exchange value, or surplus-value.
Surplus-value was present in areas of the New World that were still immersed in slavery.
This scrupulousness is exhibited in a particularly astute account of surplus-value that follows the concept through the complex development it undergoes at the hands of Lacan in his seventeenth seminar, The Other Side of Psychoanalysis.
Marx's analysis of labour-exploitation is developed in terms of the category surplus-value.
The welfare state had pretended to manage class conflict by redistributing extorted surplus-value while maintaining the wage-form as the fundamental social tie.