surveyor's chain


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surveyor's chain

n
(Surveying) a measuring chain 22 yards in length; Gunter's chain. See chain7
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I could drag my old surveyor's chain, or a 100-foot tape, or my hip chain (a box containing a spool of thread passing through a measuring device).
As land was opened up from the Atlantic Ocean westward it was surveyed or measured using a surveyor's chain. The surveyor's chain is four rods (also called poles) long.
The designed accuracy of a steel surveyor's chain is only true if it is at standard temperature, usually 72[degrees]F, and has a standard tension applied, usually 15 pounds.
The other difference between a surveyor's chain and a standard tape is the graduations.
Linklater paints fascinating portraits of men from Ferdinand Hassler, who introduced the American Customary System of measurement used today, to Edward Gunter, who in the sixteenth century invented the surveyor's chain that was central to the survey and this country's way of measuring land since its beginnings.
For him, the instrument of conquest was the 22-yard surveyor's chain, devised in 1607 by a little-known English mathematician named Edmund Gunter.
The surveyor's chain that was in a letter recently (Farm Collector, June 2005, page 6) reminded me of something I learned when I researched my family's history.
Chaining is the process of measuring distances using a surveyor's chain. Historically, chaining was the preferred method for measuring distances accurately, but modern electronic means have replaced chaining for professional surveyors.
The Surveyor's Chain (Farm Collector letters, June 2005) is called the Gunter's Chain, named after the inventor, E.
A surveyor's chain set is exactly 66 feet in length, it could be carried through the forest and was lightweight (for it's time).
Within the collection is a Gunter's Surveyor's chain set, an item quite similar to John Lemke's photos.
Acknowledging that "a land surveyor was only as good as his instruments," we are introduced to the uses and relative merits of a range of devices, from surveyor's chains and circumferentors to perambulators and theodolites.