Susan


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Translations
Zuzana
Susanne
Susanna
Suzanne
ZsuzsaZsuzsanna
Susanne
Susanna

Susan

[ˈsuːzn] NSusana

Susan

nSusanne f
References in classic literature ?
Susan Baker, who, during her few weeks' sojourn in the little house, had come to worship "young Mrs.
Telephone messages were sent up to the Glen, Doctor Dave and a white-capped nurse came hastily down, Marilla paced the garden walks between the quahog shells, murmuring prayers between her set lips, and Susan sat in the kitchen with cotton wool in her ears and her apron over her head.
A dialogue between the landlady and Susan the chamber-maid, proper to be read by all inn-keepers and their servants; with the arrival, and affable behaviour of a beautiful young lady; which may teach persons of condition how they may acquire the love of the whole world.
The landlady, remembering that Susan had been the only person out of bed when the door was burst open, resorted presently to her, to enquire into the first occasion of the disturbance, as well as who the strange gentleman was, and when and how he arrived.
Another moment and Fanny was in the narrow entrance-passage of the house, and in her mother's arms, who met her there with looks of true kindness, and with features which Fanny loved the more, because they brought her aunt Bertram's before her, and there were her two sisters: Susan, a well-grown fine girl of fourteen, and Betsey, the youngest of the family, about five--both glad to see her in their way, though with no advantage of manner in receiving her.
"I was upstairs, mama, moving my things," said Susan, in a fearless, self-defending tone, which startled Fanny.
One of them observed, looking down at Susan collapsed on the seat: "She is--one may say--half dead."
Susan pronounced some incomprehensible words, glaring at the table.
Perrott again knew that he was not "quite," as Susan stated in her diary; not quite a gentleman she meant, for he was the son of a grocer in Leeds, had started life with a basket on his back, and now, though practically indistinguishable from a born gentleman, showed his origin to keen eyes in an impeccable neatness of dress, lack of freedom in manner, extreme cleanliness of person, and a certain indescribable timidity and precision with his knife and fork which might be the relic of days when meat was rare, and the way of handling it by no means gingerly.
"Suppose we go and see what's to be seen over there?" said Arthur to Susan, and the pair walked off together, their departure certainly sending some thrill of emotion through the rest.
Lady Susan has certainly contrived, in the space of a fortnight, to make my brother like her.
"Susan Sowerby," said Ben Weatherstaff, getting close to her.