Susiana


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Related to Susiana: Susa, media, Iran, Babylon

Su·si·a·na

 (so͞o′zē-ä′nə, -ăn′ə)
See Elam.
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Noun1.Susiana - an ancient country in southwestern Asia to the east of the Tigris River (in what is modern Iran)Susiana - an ancient country in southwestern Asia to the east of the Tigris River (in what is modern Iran); was known for its warlike people
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References in classic literature ?
In mail their horses clad, yet fleet and strong, Prauncing their riders bore, the flower and choice Of many provinces from bound to bound-- From Arachosia, from Candaor east, And Margiana, to the Hyrcanian cliffs Of Caucasus, and dark Iberian dales; From Atropatia, and the neighbouring plains Of Adiabene, Media, and the south Of Susiana, to Balsara's haven.
Khuzestan means the land of the Khuzi or the original inhabitants of the region of Susiana. The Arab population was introduced to the region following the Arab/ Islamic invasion of the seventh century CE.
The Nergal Gate Museum piece is likely to have originated from this latter palace, probably from Room F (the "Susiana" room) (36) or Room G, (37) which show similar scenes and have a similar right-to-left direction of prisoners.
An alliance with Elamites (in Anshan and later in Susiana and even upon Babylon's borders) was both necessary and easily obtained by Cyrus.
Chogha Mish II: The development of a prehistoric regional center in lowland Susiana, southwestern Iran; final report on the last six seasons of excavations, 1972-1978.
"The Changing Organization of Uruk Administration on the Susiana Plain".
"Style and Information: An Analysis of Susiana Ceramics," JAnthArch 2, pp.
Ligozzi shows two very different varieties of iris in a single painting: The "Mourning Iris (Iris susiana) and Spanish Iris (Iris xyphium)" depicts the common Spanish iris, with its many cultivars next to the imposing and exotic mourning iris newly imported from Persia.
Similarly, primary sources demonstrate that political complexity--the rise of state-level polities--in West Asia had twin origins in Mesopotamia (southern Iraq) and the Susiana (western Iran), not just the former.
Alexandria in Susiana, for instance, does not occur until the final list, and only the table on page 240 reveals -- in Greek -- that this is the same city described in text and index as Alexandria-Spasinou Charax.
Moreover, widespread abandonment of settlements on Iran's Susiana plain created an uninhabited, 9-mile-wide "buffer zone" between two large Late Uruk communities known as Susa and Chogha Mish.
Recently, I was able to prove that the Simaskians, who ruled over a vast territory, extending from their capital Ansan in the south to the Caspian Sea in the north, were able to enlarge it considerably to the west when they reclaimed Susa and the Susiana plain from the Sumerians at the beginning of Ibbi-Sin's reign.