Sussex


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Sus·sex

 (sŭs′ĭks)
An Anglo-Saxon kingdom of southern England bordering on the English Channel. Founded in the fifth century ad, it was captured by the kingdom of Wessex in 825.

Sussex

(ˈsʌsɪks)
n
1. (Placename) (until 1974) a county of SE England, now divided into the separate counties of East Sussex and West Sussex
2. (Historical Terms) (in Anglo-Saxon England) the kingdom of the South Saxons, which became a shire of the kingdom of Wessex in the early 9th century ad
3. (Placename) (in Anglo-Saxon England) the kingdom of the South Saxons, which became a shire of the kingdom of Wessex in the early 9th century ad
4. (Breeds) a breed of red beef cattle originally from Sussex
5. (Breeds) a heavy and long-established breed of domestic fowl used principally as a table bird

Sus•sex

(ˈsʌs ɪks)

n.
1. a former county in SE England: divided into East Sussex and West Sussex.
2. a kingdom of the Anglo-Saxon heptarchy in SE England.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Sussex - a county in southern England on the English ChannelSussex - a county in southern England on the English Channel; formerly an Anglo-Saxon kingdom that was captured by Wessex in the 9th century
England - a division of the United Kingdom
References in classic literature ?
Vernon's invitation to prolong his stay in Sussex, that they may have some hunting together.
Leaning forward in the cab, he listened intently to MacDonald's short sketch of the problem which awaited us in Sussex.
The family of Dashwood had long been settled in Sussex.
She was looking at plans one day in the following spring--they had finally decided to go down into Sussex and build--when Mrs.
He was indeed a scion of one of the very oldest families in the kingdom, though his branch was a cadet one which had separated from the northern Musgraves some time in the sixteenth century, and had established itself in western Sussex, where the Manor House of Hurlstone is perhaps the oldest inhabited building in the county.
They puzzled a worthy Sussex doctor some ninety years ago; but who in the world could have hoped--hoped--to have seen a sight like that?
You are to picture the loveliness of nature upon that August day, the freshness of the morning air, the golden glare of the summer sunshine, the cloudless sky, the luxuriant green of the Sussex woods, and the deep purple of heather-clad downs.
Scape, lately admitted partner into the great Calcutta House of Fogle, Fake, and Cracksman, in which poor Scape had embarked seventy thousand pounds, the earnings of a long and honourable life, taking Fake's place, who retired to a princely park in Sussex (the Fogles have been long out of the firm, and Sir Horace Fogle is about to be raised to the peerage as Baron Bandanna)--admitted, I say, partner into the great agency house of Fogle and Fake two years before it failed for a million and plunged half the Indian public into misery and ruin.
Sir Luke de Ponynges, Sir Thomas West, Sir Maurice de Bruin, Sir Arthur Lipscombe, Sir Walter Ramsey, and stout Sir Oliver Buttesthorn were all marching south with levies from Andover, Arlesford, Odiham and Winchester, while from Sussex came Sir John Clinton, Sir Thomas Cheyne, and Sir John Fallislee, with a troop of picked men-at-arms, making for their port at Southampton.
After that he travelled for some years, and finally he bought a small place called Woodman's Lee, near Forest Row, in Sussex.
Sent to Carfax, Sussex, as no county given, delivered late by twenty-two hours.
The road up through the pine-woods, the clean drawing-room, the view over the Sussex Weald--all hung before her bright and distinct, but pathetic as the pictures in a gallery to which, after much experience, a traveller returns.