Suwarrow


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Su`war´row


n.1.(Bot.) The giant cactus (Cereus giganteus); - so named by the Indians of Arizona. Called also saguaro.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dead Man Fall Suwarrow IT is 9294 miles from Glasgow to the low coral atoll in the Pacific Ocean's Cook Islands that this song is named after.
Just like the girl of the song who runs off and meets a stranger, I'd quite like some Suwarrow sunshine.
Garry peaked as a Severe Category 3 storm north of Suwarrow and Palmerston Island in the Northern Cook Islands, with average wind speeds estimated at 80 kt (41 m [s.sup.-1]) and gusts up to 110 kt (57 m [s.sup.-1]).
The benefits of sailing with a rally were dramatically demonstrated while the boats were anchored at the Pacific atoll of Suwarrow. Australian catamaran Ensemble was caught by strong westerly winds, causing her to drag straight onto the coral of the lee shore.
The route they'll be following will be a mix of organised stages and free cruising: Departing Saint Lucia in January, then sailing to San Blas, Panama Canal, Galapagos, Marquesas, Tuamotos, Tahiti, Bora Bora, Niue, Suwarrow, Tonga, Fiji and Vanuatu, before arriving in Mackay in July.
Pearl oysters at Suwarrow in the Cook Islands became so depleted during the early 1990s that adults were imported from Penrhyn to assist in their recovery (Dalzell & Adams 1996).
The cross, symbolizing the Atonement, becomes ironically its antithesis: "The crimson cross glared o'er the field; / But red with no redeeming gore" (VIII, 122); and a reference to immortality earlier in the stanzas devoted to Suwarrow is scathingly ironic (VII, 84).
However, a proposal to establish a pearl farm on uninhabited Suwarrow atoll was rejected in 2001 over fears that the atoll's large seabird colonies would be disturbed.
He had on when he went away, a striped woollen shirt with a checquered collar, his coat, jacket and trousers grey homespun fulled cloth, a black castor hat partly worn, and a pair of soal'd suwarrow boots, which having been trod back, were cut open and closed up perhaps four or five inches on the heel.
Continuing this bloodless crusade, the critic brands the victor of Ismail, General Suwarrow, "a bad man" because of "the chaotic and destructive contradictions of his character" (246).
This shape-shifting takes on literal force when, at the dramatic climax of the book, Frisbie's ultimate retreat-paradise of Suwarrow is almost totally blown away in a hurricane.
Johnson is recognized by General Suwarrow, who welcomes him and Don Juan as allies in the attack on Ismail.