Svevo


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Svevo

(Italian ˈsvevo)
n
(Biography) Italo (iˈtalo), original name Ettore Schnitz. 1861–1928, Italian novelist and short-story writer, best known for the novel Confessions of Zeno (1923)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Picasso approda alla conclusione che sulla soglia del novecento la realtAaAaAeA non puAaAaAeA piAaAaAeA essere interpretata attraverso le vecchie cat del disegno ottocentesco figlie della sensibilitAaAaAeA borghese; medesi conclusione a cui sembra giungere, sul versante letterario, Svevo, attraverso una scrittura che AaAaAeA?
In the Introduction, Deborah Amberson laments the absence of a unifying and unified category of "Modernism" from the Italian literary canon: "Literary modernism, a classification traditionally avoided by the Italian critical orthodoxy." The title of the book derives from Gadda's self-proclaimed status of "giraffe" within the Italian literary community and hints at the difficulty of inducting into the Italian literary canon modernist writers such as Gadda himself, Tozzi, and Svevo, whose work does not properly fit into the sanctioned catalogue.
One neighbor, Svevo Brooks, said that he awoke early Wednesday morning to the sound of a vehicle traveling down Elk Avenue.
Written by Italo Svevo (ne Ettore Schmitz)the son of a German Jewish merchant and an Italian Jewish mother, and most notably James Joyce's consultant for the character Leopold BloomZeno's Conscience probes the depths of psychoanalysis, its alternating therapeutic and frustrating pursuits, and one man's search for happiness.
Laughlin has published virtually all of Italo Svevo's work in English.
To warn readers of what lies ahead, the narrator mentions that Maruja La noche-Harris, a "controversial" literary critic, has made a majestic apology of El mago de Viena, arguing it could be considered a "light" novel, only if one thought that because of its theme the work belonged to the honorable literary lineage of Kafka, Svevo, Broch, and the contemporary Spanish writer Vila-Matas.
Rube (1921) is usually presented as one of the novels best expressing in Italy the moral and philosophical crisis of the early twentieth century, together with Tozzi's Con gli occhi chiusi (1919), Svevo's La coscienza di Zeno (1923), Pirandello's Uno, nessuno e centomila (1926), and Moravia's Gli indifferenti (1929).