sweatshop

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sweat·shop

 (swĕt′shŏp′)
n.
A shop or factory in which employees work long hours at low wages under poor conditions.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

sweatshop

(ˈswɛtˌʃɒp)
n
(Industrial Relations & HR Terms) a workshop where employees work long hours under bad conditions for low wages
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

sweat•shop

(ˈswɛtˌʃɒp)

n.
a shop employing workers at low wages, for long hours, and under poor conditions.
[1865–70]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sweatshop - factory where workers do piecework for poor pay and are prevented from forming unionssweatshop - factory where workers do piecework for poor pay and are prevented from forming unions; common in the clothing industry
factory, manufactory, manufacturing plant, mill - a plant consisting of one or more buildings with facilities for manufacturing
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

sweatshop

[ˈswɛtʃɒp] nusine f à sueur usine où les employés sont sous-payés et soumis à des conditions de travail extrêmement dures
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
We might now pause to ask ourselves how general and significant the problem of the new sweatshops is, and how effective the institutional change following from the activism of the late 1990s is likely to be in combating them.
They discover the children there are forced to work in sweatshops by Bull soldiers and live under terrible conditions.
They're sweatshops. And because they are too poor to create genuine two-way exchange, CAFTA isn't really a trade agreement at all.
Students Against Sweatshops ($15.00) by Liza Featherstone and United Students Against Sweatshops Verso, 2002
On December 9, the National Labor Committee for Worker and Human Rights and New York University students held a protest against WalMart's use of sweatshops. They also condemned the lack of paid maternity leave in Bangladeshi factories that produce goods for the retail giant.
The pilot manufacturing factory for SweatX, the noble anti-sweatshop brand that aspired to prove that fully unionized and even worker-owned garment factories can thrive in a sea of sweatshops, quietly closed its doors in May.
Like the young king, many Americans also adopt this practice when they realize that real-life sweatshops have practices horrible enough to be relegated to the realm of nightmares.
Like many who toil inside sweatshops, most of these jornaleros are in this country illegally, and, to them, getting deported is a bigger threat than not getting paid.
In examining the origins of sweatshops in late-nineteenth-century New York City, Bender offers a novel approach to the essential role of language in linking sweated work, Jewish workers, and the subordination of wage-earning women.
'That will undercut our trade union reforms and undercut the national minimum wage and exploit individuals beyond belief in sweatshops.
The efforts of Students Against Sweatshops are paying off.
And chances are these and many other things we use every day were made in sweatshops.