melilot

(redirected from Sweet clovers)
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Related to Sweet clovers: white sweet clover, Melilotus alba

mel·i·lot

 (mĕl′ə-lŏt′)
[Middle English melilote, from Old French, from Latin melilōtos, from Greek : meli, honey; see melit- in Indo-European roots + lōtos, lotus; see lotus.]

melilot

(ˈmɛlɪˌlɒt)
n
(Plants) any leguminous plant of the Old World genus Melilotus, having narrow clusters of small white or yellow fragrant flowers. Also called: sweet clover
[C15: via Old French from Latin melilōtos, from Greek: sweet clover, from meli honey + lōtos lotus]

mel•i•lot

(ˈmɛl əˌlɒt)

n.
a cloverlike plant of the genus Melilotus, of the legume family, grown as forage.
[1375–1425; Middle English mellilote (< Middle French) < Latin melilōtos < Greek melílōtos a clover =méli honey + lōtós lotus]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.melilot - erect annual or biennial plant grown extensively especially for hay and soil improvementmelilot - erect annual or biennial plant grown extensively especially for hay and soil improvement
genus Melilotus - Old World herbs: the sweet clovers
Melilotus alba, white melilot, white sweet clover - biennial plant; valuable honey plant
Melilotus officinalis, yellow sweet clover - biennial yellow-flowered Eurasian plant having aromatic leaves used as carminative or flavoring agent; widely cultivated especially as green manure or cover crop
ligneous plant, woody plant - a plant having hard lignified tissues or woody parts especially stems
References in classic literature ?
There were rosy bleeding-hearts and great splendid crimson peonies; white, fragrant narcissi and thorny, sweet Scotch roses; pink and blue and white columbines and lilac-tinted Bouncing Bets; clumps of southernwood and ribbon grass and mint; purple Adam-and-Eve, daffodils, and masses of sweet clover white with its delicate, fragrant, feathery sprays; scarlet lightning that shot its fiery lances over prim white musk-flowers; a garden it was where sunshine lingered and bees hummed, and winds, beguiled into loitering, purred and rustled.
Others, such as sweet clovers and sorghum-sudangrass hybrids, grow deep, aggressive taproots that break up soil compaction.
parsnips, goatsbeard and sweet clovers take over the roadsides.
The sweet clovers are a separate group belonging to the genus Melilotus, and the bush clovers are placed in the genus Lespedeza.