sweet pea

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Related to Sweet-pea: Lathyrus odoratus

sweet pea

n.
Any of several climbing plants of the genus Lathyrus of the pea family, especially the annual vine L. odoratus, native to Sicily and widely cultivated for its variously colored, fragrant flowers.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

sweet pea

n
(Plants) a climbing leguminous plant, Lathyrus odoratus, of S Europe, widely cultivated for its butterfly-shaped fragrant flowers of delicate pastel colours
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

sweet′ pea`


n.
a climbing plant, Lathyrus odoratus, of the legume family, having sweet-scented flowers.
[1725–35]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sweet pea - climbing garden plant having fragrant pastel-colored flowerssweet pea - climbing garden plant having fragrant pastel-colored flowers
genus Lathyrus, Lathyrus - genus of climbing herbs of Old World and temperate North and South America: vetchling; wild pea
vine - a plant with a weak stem that derives support from climbing, twining, or creeping along a surface
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

sweet pea

npisello odoroso
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
It was a little dialogue between asters and sweet-peas, wild canaries in the lilac bush, and the guardian spirit of the garden.
To keep up a mixed stock of even such extremely close varieties as the variously coloured sweet-peas, they must be each year harvested separately, and the seed then mixed in due proportion, otherwise the weaker kinds will steadily decrease in numbers and disappear.
The largest was a regular hothouse bouquet, of tea-rosebuds, scentless heath, and smilax; the second was just a handful of sweet-peas and mignonette, with a few cheerful pansies, and one fragrant little rose in the middle; the third, a small posy of scarlet verbenas, white feverfew, and green leaves.