shifting cultivation

(redirected from Swidden agriculture)

shifting cultivation

n
(Agriculture) a land-use system, esp in tropical Africa, in which a tract of land is cultivated until its fertility diminishes, when it is abandoned until this is restored naturally
Translations

shifting cultivation

nagricoltura itinerante
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References in periodicals archive ?
Swidden agriculture appears as a constant culprit of deforestation and thus a target of policy interventions from the colonial times.
They continue to threaten traditional use of land and the cultural traditions of the Hmong that are closely related to swidden agriculture.
Researchers from Melbourne and Copenhagen believe that swidden agriculture also known as "kaingin" in the Philippines is not actually a destructive farming system that many experts had condemned for the last 60 or so years.
In relation to maize cultivation in particular, what was in the process of becoming consolidated was the very thing referred to by Fox (1977:77) some half a century later as he sought to account for the similarities between Timor and Sumba and the notable exception of the palm-tapping economy of Roti Island: 'It is not swidden agriculture per se that accounts for the precarious subsistence base of the peoples of Timor [.
Although this group reportedly seeks shelter in the limestone caves and rock shelters of the sinkhole during the rainy season, they inhabit permanent houses and practice swidden agriculture at other times of the year, and therefore cannot in a technical sense be called foragers.
In his study of subsistence change in Java, he stated that, in ecological terms, the most distinctive positive characteristic of swidden agriculture, and the characteristic most in contrast with wet-rice agriculture, is that it is integrated into, and when genuinely adaptive, maintains the general structure of the pre-existing natural ecosystems into which it is projected.
While many authors have emphasized Hmong movement south from China as resulting from persecution, Gary Yia Lee (1985/86) argues, in contrast, that most Hmong moved south in search of fertile land for conducting swidden agriculture and growing opium, with the mass movement of Hmong beginning in 1810-1820 (see, also, Culas and Michaud, 2004).
They practice swidden agriculture to grow a variety of crops suited to the different environments found on their mountainside: mangos, chiles, and sugar cane in the warm lowlands and corn, beans, coffee, and potatoes in the highlands.
Now, deprived of a reliable income and encouraged by the government to reduce traditional swidden agriculture (a form of shifting slash-and-burn rice cultivation), descend from the highlands and embrace a more cash-crop-oriented economy, some Akha face new difficulties in adapting to the lowlands.
In this case a local group was observed to have undergone profound social and kinship change when forced to abandon swidden agriculture and take up wet-rice cultivation when forest cover was depleted.
The flood period is considered the 'fallow' in this floodplain modification of swidden agriculture.