swim bladder

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swim bladder

n.
A gas-filled structure in many fishes that functions to maintain buoyancy and, in some species, to aid in respiration or to produce sound. Also called air bladder, gas bladder.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

swim bladder

n
(Zoology) ichthyol another name for air bladder1
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

air′ blad`der


n.
1. a vesicle or sac containing air.
2. an air-filled sac at the top of the body cavity in bony fishes, serving in most to regulate hydrostatic pressure. Also called swim bladder.
[1725–35]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

swim bladder

(swĭm)
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.swim bladder - an air-filled sac near the spinal column in many fishes that helps maintain buoyancyswim bladder - an air-filled sac near the spinal column in many fishes that helps maintain buoyancy
sac - a structure resembling a bag in an animal
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

swim bladder

nSchwimmblase f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

swim bladder

n (Zool) → vescica natatoria
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
The most common is isinglass, made from the swim bladders of tropical fish.
The lucrative market for the swim bladders has turned the Gulf of California into a battleground, as armed poachers use drug cartel-like tactics to get hold of the "cocaine of the sea".
When pulled from the ocean's depths, fish undergo excruciating decompression - the internal pressure causes their swim bladders to rupture, pops their eyes out, and pushes their stomachs out through their mouths.
Many common fish, with their gas-filled swim bladders, provide readily detectable targets.
Tests showed that the animals didn't have swim bladders. Fish fill these sacs inside their bodies with air.
They do not have swim bladders and the upper jaw is not fused to the cranium; the lower jaw is articulated with the upper.
Totoaba swim bladders (a buoyancy organ possessed by most bony fish) are coveted in China, where they're turned into a soup believed to enhance fertility and benefit general health.
The Leeds has always been a stronghold for the eel, but stocks of this fish have been decimated from the effect of a parasite that has infected their swim bladders.
The fishing fleets are primarily searching for another threatened species, the totoaba, whose swim bladders are in high demand in China, where the organ is used to prepare a specialty soup (SourceMex, March 25, 2015).
Isinglass, derived from fish swim bladders, and gelatin, usually from cattle, are both routinely used to fine and clarify wine.
Some beers, ciders and wine, while made from plant materials, are processed using isinglass from fish swim bladders and are, therefore, not vegan.