symbiosis

(redirected from Symbiotic relationship)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia.

sym·bi·o·sis

 (sĭm′bē-ō′sĭs, -bī-)
n. pl. sym·bi·o·ses (-sēz)
1. Biology A close, prolonged association between two or more different organisms of different species that may, but does not necessarily, benefit each member.
2. A relationship of mutual benefit or dependence.

[Greek sumbiōsis, companionship, from sumbioun, to live together, from sumbios, living together : sun-, syn- + bios, life; see gwei- in Indo-European roots.]

sym′bi·ot′ic (-ŏt′ĭk), sym′bi·ot′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
sym′bi·ot′i·cal·ly adv.

symbiosis

(ˌsɪmbɪˈəʊsɪs; ˌsɪmbaɪˈəʊsɪs)
n
1. (Biology) a close and usually obligatory association of two organisms of different species that live together, often to their mutual benefit
2. (Sociology) a similar relationship between interdependent persons or groups
[C19: via New Latin from Greek: a living together; see symbiont]
ˌsymbiˈotic, ˌsymbiˈotical adj

sym•bi•o•sis

(ˌsɪm biˈoʊ sɪs, -baɪ-)

n., pl. -ses (-sēz).
1.
a. the living together of two dissimilar organisms, as in mutualism, commensalism, or parasitism.
b. (formerly) mutualism.
2. any interdependent or mutually beneficial relationship between two persons, groups, etc.
[1615–25; < Greek symbíōsis=symbiō-, variant s. of symbioûn to live together (sym- sym- + bioûn to live) + -sis -sis]
sym`bi•ot′ic (-ˈɒt ɪk) sym`bi•ot′i•cal, adj.
sym`bi•ot′i•cal•ly, adv.

sym·bi·o·sis

(sĭm′bē-ō′sĭs)
The close association between two or more different organisms of different species, often but not necessarily benefiting each member.

symbiotic adjective
Did You Know? Two organisms that live together in symbiosis may have one of three kinds of relationships: mutualism, commensalism, or parasitism. The mutualism shown by the rhinoceros and the tickbird benefits both. Riding on the rhino's back, the tickbird eats its fill of the ticks that bother the rhino while the rhino gets warning calls from the bird when it senses danger. In commensalism, one member benefits and the other is unaffected. Certain barnacles attach themselves to whales, gaining a safe home and transportation to food-rich waters. But the whales are generally unaffected by the barnacles' presence. In parasitism, though, one species generally gets hurt, as when fleas infest a dog's coat and feed on its blood.

symbiosis

a relationship or association between two or more organisms that is harmful to none of them. — symbiotic, adj.
See also: Organisms
the living together of two dissimilar organisms; the relationship may be beneficial to both (mutualism and symbiosis), beneficial to one without effect on the other (commensalism), beneficial to one and detrimental to the other (parasitism), detrimental to the first without any effect on the other (amensalism), or detrimental to both (synnecrosis). — symbiotic, adj.
See also: Biology

symbiosis

The living together of two organisms from different species for mutual benefit.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.symbiosis - the relation between two different species of organisms that are interdependent; each gains benefits from the other
interdependence, interdependency, mutuality - a reciprocal relation between interdependent entities (objects or individuals or groups)
trophobiosis - a symbiotic relation in which one organism protects the other in return for some kind of food product
Translations

symbiosis

[ˌsɪmbɪˈəʊsɪs] Nsimbiosis f

symbiosis

[ˌsɪmbaɪˈəʊsɪs] n
(between organisms)symbiose f
(between people, organizations, systems)symbiose f

symbiosis

nSymbiose f

symbiosis

[ˌsɪmbɪˈəʊsɪs] nsimbiosi f inv

sym·bi·o·sis

n. simbiosis, unión estrecha de dos organismos que pertenecen a especies diferentes.

symbiosis

n (psych, etc.) simbiosis f
References in periodicals archive ?
Civil servants and the political party in Government have a symbiotic relationship in putting into practice the policies the governing party were elected to introduce.
This collection, which honors Professor Dinstein for his excellent scholarship and mentorship, describes that symbiotic relationship and ways to dismantle such a rigid and yet fragile interdependence.
3 (R&D expenditures may constitute an important part of a symbiotic relationship.
Much racial strife is catalogued here, alongside the requisite thumbnail sketches of playwright Tennessee Williams, who achieved a symbiotic relationship with the city; Armstrong, a native son who eventually scornfully declared, "They treat me better all over the world than they do in my own hometown"; and Ruby Bridges, whose integration into the city's schools unwittingly led to segregation via gentrification.
This symbiotic relationship has made the DAV the strong service organization it has become, and one of the reasons conventions and conferences remain necessary and effective.
Ants fascinate us because they live in a symbiotic relationship with one another, building colonies and sharing earth in harmonious ways.
Teenagers will tend to hook into the ecological perspective quickly because they have seen what their parents and grandparents have done to the environment; they're very clued into the symbiotic relationship between trees and people.
This symbiotic relationship between local government and the tourism industry raises a logical question.
Architecture's symbiotic relationship with global economics makes the choice of Daniel Libeskind's design as much a politically as an aesthetically strategic move.
and the House of Saud and of how this symbiotic relationship served both parties well (with some wrinkles here and there) until recently.
officials let alone rigorous debate within the public sphere of these interventions and their symbiotic relationship with the rise of terrorism.
The increasingly symbiotic relationship between the economies of China and Japan bodes well for sustainable growth in Asian private sector expenditure.