synchrotron

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syn·chro·tron

 (sĭng′krə-trŏn′, sĭn′-)
n.
An accelerator in which charged particles are accelerated around a fixed circular path by an electric field and held to the path by an increasing magnetic field.

synchrotron

(ˈsɪŋkrəˌtrɒn)
n
(General Physics) a type of particle accelerator similar to a betatron but having an electric field of fixed frequency with electrons but not with protons as well as a changing magnetic field. It is capable of producing very high energies in the GeV range
[C20: from synchro- + (elec)tron]

syn•chro•tron

(ˈsɪŋ krəˌtrɒn)

n.
a type of cyclotron consisting of magnetic sections alternately spaced with sections in which particles are electrostatically accelerated.
[1945–50]

syn·chro·tron

(sĭng′krə-trŏn′)
A device that accelerates charged subatomic particles, such as protons and electrons, in a circular path, greatly increasing their energies. Unlike cyclotrons that consist of a continuous spiral through which particles are accelerated, synchrotrons consist of a single tube in the shape of a large ring. The particles rotate over and over again through this tube at increasing speeds. Synchrotrons are used to study subatomic structures. See more at cyclotron.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.synchrotron - cyclotron in which the electric field is maintained at a constant frequency
cosmotron - a large proton synchrotron; uses frequency modulation of an electric field to accelerate protons
cyclotron - an accelerator that imparts energies of several million electron-volts to rapidly moving particles
Translations

synchrotron

[ˈsɪŋkrəˌtrɒn] Nsincrotrón m
References in periodicals archive ?
The in situ measurements were carried out at SWING beam line of Soleil Syncrotron, France, in which the radiation is produced by the U20 ondulator and monochromatized by a Si(111) double crystal; the scattering patterns were also collected by a CCD detector.
Giuseppe Cocconi (1914-), an Italian physicist of the school of Enrico Fermi, is the retired director of the CERN proton syncrotron in Geneva.