synecdoche

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syn·ec·do·che

 (sĭ-nĕk′də-kē)
n.
A figure of speech in which the name of a part is used to stand for the whole (as hand for sailor), the whole for a part (as the law for police officer), the specific for the general (as cutthroat for assassin), the general for the specific (as thief for pickpocket), or the material for the thing made from it (as steel for sword).

[Middle English synodoches, from Medieval Latin synodoche, alteration of Latin synecdochē, from Greek sunekdokhē, from sunekdekhesthai, to take on a share of : sun-, syn- + ekdekhesthai, to understand (ek-, out of; see eghs in Indo-European roots + dekhesthai, to take; see dek- in Indo-European roots).]

syn′ec·doch′ic (sĭn′ĕk-dŏk′ĭk), syn′ec·doch′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.

synecdoche

(sɪnˈɛkdəkɪ)
n
(Linguistics) a figure of speech in which a part is substituted for a whole or a whole for a part, as in 50 head of cattle for 50 cows, or the army for a soldier
[C14: via Latin from Greek sunekdokhē, from syn- + ekdokhē interpretation, from dekhesthai to accept]
synecdochic, ˌsynecˈdochical adj
ˌsynecˈdochically adv

syn•ec•do•che

(sɪˈnɛk də ki)

n.
a figure of speech in which a part is used for the whole or the whole for a part, the special for the general or the general for the special, as in ten sail for ten ships or a Croesus for a rich man.
[1350–1400; < Latin synecdochē < Greek, =syn- syn- + ekdochḗ, v. derivative of ekdéchesthai to receive, understand = ek- ec- + déchesthai to receive]
syn•ec•doch•ic (ˌsɪn ɪkˈdɒk ɪk) syn`ec•doch′i•cal, adj.
syn`ec•doch′i•cal•ly, adv.

synecdoche

the use of a part for a whole or a whole for a part, the special for the general or the general for the special, as in “a Rockefeller” for a rich man or “wheels” for transportation. — synecdochic, synecdochical, adj.
See also: Rhetoric and Rhetorical Devices

synecdoche

1. An expression in which part of something is used to stand for the whole (as in “a sail” to mean “a ship”), or the whole is used to mean a part (as in “The navy arrived.” to mean A sailor arrived.”).
2. A figure of speech where use of a part stands for the whole.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.synecdoche - substituting a more inclusive term for a less inclusive one or vice versa
fireside, hearth - home symbolized as a part of the fireplace; "driven from hearth and home"; "fighting in defense of their firesides"
figure of speech, trope, image, figure - language used in a figurative or nonliteral sense
face - a part of a person that is used to refer to a person; "he looked out at a roomful of faces"; "when he returned to work he met many new faces"
Translations
synekdocha
Synekdoche

synecdoche

[sɪˈnekdəkɪ] Nsinécdoque f

synecdoche

nSynekdoche f
References in periodicals archive ?
As seen with analyses in the last section, Rigaud-Drayton is also interested in identity, citing "Apollinaire's writings as a synechdoche for the self" (134) and she discusses elliptical gaps as "insights into what cannot be put into words: the forbidden fruit of knowledge which is the self" (141).
The common example of this kind of synechdoche in Persian poems is "earth" but it refers to "human-being".
Timothy Sweet notes that the image of the whip in the final word--"scourged"--functions as a synechdoche "for all repressive force" (188).
She then re-examines the sonnets in the context of Sand's fiction to come to a more "affirmative answer" to the question: "Does the sonnet as a synechdoche of lyric poetry succeed or fail to transcend the gendered constraints of the human body?
I do not mean to say that Dante might not function as a synechdoche for an entire vernacular tradition from which Petrarch wishes to distance himself (as Steinberg says he does for innovations in the production of literary manuscripts), but just that his argument could be more nuanced.
ultimately stands as a synechdoche for the cultural heritage of the