synovium

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Related to Synovial membranes: Synovial capsule, synovium, Synovial space

synovium

A membrane that lines a joint or surrounds a tendon and releases fluid allowing for joint movement.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.synovium - a thin membrane in synovial (freely moving) joints that lines the joint capsule and secretes synovial fluidsynovium - a thin membrane in synovial (freely moving) joints that lines the joint capsule and secretes synovial fluid
tissue layer, membrane - a pliable sheet of tissue that covers or lines or connects the organs or cells of animals or plants
Translations

sy·no·vi·um

n. membrana sinovial.
References in periodicals archive ?
5 For rheumatoid arthritis, it is believed that MTX regulates cell growth by inhibiting folate metabolism in lymphocytes and other cells, and also has an anti-inflammatory mechanism through the promotion of adenosine synthesis in vascular endothelial cells and other cells in synovial membranes. The subcutaneous formulation is administered once a week via subcutaneous injection, which enables a high bioavailability to be maintained.
Methotrexate (MTX) is positioned as the anchor drug for rheumatoid arthritis treatment.(5) For rheumatoid arthritis, it is believed that MTX regulates cell growth by inhibiting folate metabolism in lymphocytes and other cells, and also has an anti-inflammatory mechanism through the promotion of adenosine synthesis in vascular endothelial cells and other cells in synovial membranes. The subcutaneous formulation is administered once a week via subcutaneous injection, which enables a high bioavailability to be maintained.
Morphometric analysis of blood vessels in synovial membranes obtained from clinically affected and unaffected knee joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis.
Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease characterized by chronic inflammation in the synovial membranes of multiple affected joints.[1] Interleukin-1 (IL-1) and IL-1 receptor families play important roles in inflammatory and immunological responses.[2],[3] IL-33 and its receptor ST2 belong to the IL-1 and IL-1 receptor families, respectively.[3] The pathogenic role of IL-33 in RA has been widely studied,[4],[5],[6] but there are few studies about its receptor ST2, especially the soluble form, in RA.
See image of deposition of sodium urate monohydrate crystals in synovial membranes, articular cartilage, ligaments, bursae leading to destruction of cartilage.
In 1988, Revell et al (10) reported on the histological features of synovial membranes obtained from the hip or knee joints of patients with primary OA versus OA with a traumatic/mechanical (T/M) origin.
Synovial osteochondromatosis (SOC) is a benign neoplasm characteristic of synovial connective tissue metaplasia within the synovial membranes of joints, tendon sheaths, or bursae [1-3].
These MSCs may be readily isolated from many sources such as the bone marrow, skeletal muscle, synovial membranes, adipose tissue, and umbilical cord blood [9-16].
The aim of this work was to clarify the role of prooxidant enzymes, Nox2, XO, and prolidase, in the inflammatory process that takes place in the synovial membranes of KOA patients.
capsulatum rarely invades bone or synovial membranes. (2) There are some cases in the literature of Histoplasma infection with joint involvement, and the first case of joint involvement was reported in 1942 in a patient with knee arthritis.
However, calcium crystals were not only detected in the cartilage and synovial fluid but also detected in the synovial membranes of OA patients [8, 22].