syntax

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Related to Syntactic structure: syntax

syntax

Syntax refers to the ways in which we order specific words to create logical, meaningful sentences. While the parts of speech are all the different types of words that we can use, syntax is the set of rules, patterns, or processes by which we can put them together.
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syn·tax

 (sĭn′tăks′)
n.
1.
a. The study of the rules whereby words or other elements of sentence structure are combined to form grammatical sentences.
b. A publication, such as a book, that presents such rules.
c. The pattern of formation of sentences or phrases in a language.
d. Such a pattern in a particular sentence or discourse.
2. Computers The rules governing the formation of statements in a programming language.
3. A systematic, orderly arrangement.

[French syntaxe, from Late Latin syntaxis, from Greek suntaxis, from suntassein, to put in order : sun-, syn- + tassein, tag-, to arrange.]

syntax

(ˈsɪntæks)
n
1. (Linguistics) the branch of linguistics that deals with the grammatical arrangement of words and morphemes in the sentences of a language or of languages in general
2. (Linguistics) the totality of facts about the grammatical arrangement of words in a language
3. (Linguistics) a systematic statement of the rules governing the grammatical arrangement of words and morphemes in a language
4. (Logic) logic a systematic statement of the rules governing the properly formed formulas of a logical system
5. any orderly arrangement or system
[C17: from Late Latin syntaxis, from Greek suntaxis, from suntassein to put in order, from syn- + tassein to arrange]

syn•tax

(ˈsɪn tæks)

n.
1.
a. the study of the patterns of formation of sentences and phrases from words and of the rules for the formation of grammatical sentences in a language.
b. the patterns or rules so studied: English syntax.
2.
a. the study of the well-formed formulas of a logical system.
b. the set of rules that generate such a system.
3. Computers. the grammatical rules and structural patterns governing the ordered use of appropriate words and symbols for issuing commands, writing code, etc., in a particular software application or programming language.
[1565–75; short for earlier syntaxis < Late Latin < Greek sýntaxis an arranging in order =syntag- (base of syntássein; see syntactic) + -sis -sis]

syntax

the grammatical principles by which words are used in phrases and sentences to construct meaningful combinations. — syntactic, syntactical, adj.
See also: Grammar
the study of the principles by which words are used in phrases and sentences to construct meaningful combinations. — syntactic, syntactical, adj.
See also: Linguistics

Syntax

 a connected system or order; a union of things.
Examples: syntax of being, 1661; of phantasy or imagination, 1676.

syntax

The way in which sentences are grammatically constructed, or the branch of linguistics that studies this.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.syntax - the grammatical arrangement of words in sentences
structure - the complex composition of knowledge as elements and their combinations; "his lectures have no structure"
linguistics - the scientific study of language
2.syntax - a systematic orderly arrangement
system, scheme - a group of independent but interrelated elements comprising a unified whole; "a vast system of production and distribution and consumption keep the country going"
3.syntax - studies of the rules for forming admissible sentences
linguistics - the scientific study of language
grammar - the branch of linguistics that deals with syntax and morphology (and sometimes also deals with semantics)
generative grammar - (linguistics) a type of grammar that describes syntax in terms of a set of logical rules that can generate all and only the infinite number of grammatical sentences in a language and assigns them all the correct structural description
Translations
عِلْم النَّحو
sintaxi
skladbasyntaxsyntaxe
syntaks
lauseoppisyntaksi
sintaksaskladnja
mondattan
setningafræîi
sintaksė
sintakse
skladnja
sentakssöz dizimi

syntax

[ˈsɪntæks]
A. Nsintaxis f
B. CPD syntax error Nerror m sintáctico

syntax

[ˈsɪntæks] nsyntaxe f

syntax

nSyntax f; (of sentence also)Satzbau m; syntax error (Comput) → Syntaxfehler m

syntax

[ˈsɪntæks] nsintassi f inv

syntax

(ˈsintӕks) noun
(the rules for) the correct arrangement of words in a sentence.
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, it is important to note that the syntactic structure in which the verb allege occurs is different from that in which accuse occurs, even though they have similar meanings.
Second, attraction is sensitive to structural proximity in the syntactic structure, that is, the place occupied by the local noun in the hierarchy influences the generation of attraction errors.
The data retrieved from both the BNC and COCA comprise instances which, according to the shallow syntactic structure of the of-PPs, can be classified into: (i) bare constructions, (e.
The third point of difference between the two wh-question types concerns their syntactic structure.
Their topics include the impact of technology-enhanced language learning on the writing skills of engineering students: a case study, students as producers of digital audio-visual clips in preparation for study abroad: collaboration for independent language learning, a sociolinguistic perspective on intercultural competence and computer-assisted language learning, technology-enhanced vocabulary development through a semantic network development model versus the syntactic structure development model, and attitudes of adult learners of English as a foreign language towards preparing for a language test with computer-assistance.
The types of reformulation were studied in order to clarify how subjects reformulated relative clauses into (a) other relative clauses, or (b) another syntactic structure.
Two different answers have been proposed: either syntactic structure is not necessarily binary (see, for example, Culicover & Jackendoff s, 2005 flat structure; or finite-state proposals for adjunction, as in Uriagereka, 2005, 2012; Krivochen, 2015a) or it is indeed binary, but as a result of interface requirements, particularly semantic conditions on interpretation in a derivational system driven by the need to combine conceptual information (roots) and instructions as to how to manipulate that information, particularly restricting reference (procedural nodes, in Relevance Theoretic terms, Sperber & Wilson, 1995).
The study results also indicated that learners' mother tongue interference was responsible for all their (100 percent errors) morphological errors as students translated the sentences literally or trying to replicate the syntactic structure of their mother tongue.
Following Li (2010), the suggestions were coded in terms of (a) syntactic structure (b) pragmatic strategies and (c) use of redressive actions, each of which I address briefly below.
With respect to syntactic structure of legal English, these characteristics are often attributed to a conspicuously high incidence of non-finite clauses in this register (Crystal and Davy 1969: 205; Tiersma 1999: 26; Sanchez Febrero 2003: 21).
The poem, through its relentless syntactic structure as a single unanswered question, and through its imagery recalling childhood--family minivan, melted crayons, sidewalk drawings--embodies the speaker's wrenching awareness of the tragedy.
His English sentences follow the syntactic structure of the Greek very closely, and his word choice follows translation conventions.