cell-mediated immunity

(redirected from T-cell mediated immunity)
Also found in: Medical, Encyclopedia.
Related to T-cell mediated immunity: humoral immunity

cell-mediated immunity

n.
Immunity involving cells, such as T cells and phagocytes, in contrast with humoral immunity, which involves soluble proteins (antibodies). Also called cellular immunity.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cell′-me`diated immu′nity


n.
immunity conferred to an individual through the activity of T cells, involving the direct destruction of viruses, foreign particles, etc. Compare antibody-mediated immunity.
[1970–75]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Pregnant women are more prone to HSV infection since the immunological changes during pregnancy suppress the T-cell mediated immunity thereby promoting disseminated infection.[2] During pregnancy, the misinterpretation of signs and symptoms may delay the diagnosis, and in some cases, the patients are diagnosed during autopsy.
Pregnant women are more prone to HSV infection since the immunological changes during pregnancy suppress the T-cell mediated immunity thereby promoting disseminated infection.[5,6] HSV-associated with pregnancy may lead to considerable morbidity and in some cases, it may even contribute to mortality.[4] According to a study conducted by Grossman et al., weekly culturing of all previously infected genital sites including cervix from 36 weeks of gestation till the day of delivery is considered as an admissible plan for the management of HSV-related complication during pregnancy.[7]