T-maze


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T-maze

(tē′māz′)
n. Psychology
A simple maze with one branch point, used for experimental studies of mice or other small animals. One arm of the maze leads to a reward, while the other is without an exit. Also called Y-maze.

[From its shape, resembling the letter T.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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Their results showed that the rats who had undergone the stressful swim showed better memory for which way to turn in the T-maze than those placed in shallow water.
To explore this, normal, CAM [alpha]1A-AR, and KO [alpha]1A-AR mice were tested on a multi-component T-maze and the Morris water maze.
T-maze assays show that at least some of the attractants derive from the egg cordon and are waterborne: (1) recent egg-layers without egg cordons are no more attractive than non-laying conspecifics; (2) recently deposited egg cordons are attractive, with or without a non-laying conspecific, but sham egg cordons are not; and (3) both recently deposited egg cordons and their eluates increase the attractiveness of non-laying conspecifics when placed in the surrounding seawater (Painter et al., 1991; Painter, 1992).
Gleitman used a T-maze and trained hungry rats to get equal amounts of food at two distinctive goal boxes located at each end of the maze (the goal boxes were not themselves visible from the choice point).
Indirect support for this view was reported by Smith, Pihl, and Garber (1982) who reported that Cd-exposed rats learned a spatial T-maze discrimination more rapidly than did normals.
Bloom and Perlmutter (3) showed that zebrafish, when placed in a T-maze, demonstrated either a preference for or an avoidance of donor water produced when specified numbers of conspecifics of either sex were kept in holding systems for set lengths of time.
T-maze experiments demonstrate that at least some of the attractants derive from the egg cordon and are water-borne: (1) recent egg layers without egg cordons are no more attractive than nonlaying conspecifics; (2) recently deposited egg cordons are attractive, with or without the egg-laying animal, whereas sham cordons are not; and (3) both recently deposited egg cordons and their eluates increase the attractiveness of nonlaying conspecifics when placed in the adjacent seawater (Painter et al., 1991; Painter, 1992).
On the 29th day of the experiment, animals in all groups were subjected to spontaneous alternation neurobehavioural test using the T-maze. The T-maze is shaped like a 'T' with two goal arms and a start arm.
A T-maze device was made according to method described by (Zhang et al., 1996) for testing the effect of body extract.
To directly verify this hypothesis we investigated the effects of two antidepressant drugs, fluoxetine and reboxetine, on spatial memory performance in the T-maze assay, a behavioural test for measuring the natural tendency of lab animals to explore new environment (7).
They trained rats to run in an alternating fashion in a continuous T-maze that actually looks more like the infinity sign with a wide waist, or stem.