TBTF


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TBTF

abbreviation for
too big to fail: used of financial organizations deemed too important to the economy of a country to be allowed to go bankrupt
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Dutifully, global regulators, including in the U.S., required that TBTF firms demand that their counter-parties sign the Protocol and waive their rights to escape contracts with seemingly doomed subsidiaries.
Cetorelli and Traina (2018) study the extent to which the DFA living wills help address the TBTF problem.
Guynn, Framing the TBTF Problem: The Path to a Solution, in Across the Great Divide: New Perspectives on the Financial Crisis, Chapter 13, 281-301 (Martin Neil Baily Sc John B.
The Swiss National Bank has said that UBS (UBSG.S) and Credit Suisse (CSGN.S) have more work to do to address too-big-to-fail (TBTF) emergency plans, according to Reuters.
Bank size, which is calculated as the natural logarithm of total assets, is included to capture differences in risk management capabilities (Demsetz and Strahan 1997; Elsas, Hackethal, and Holzhauser 2010) and in the possibility of public bailouts (i.e., TBTF policy) between large and small banks.
And since the Fed and its TBTF banking cohorts and congressional allies thwarted Representative Ron Paul's efforts to get a genuine audit of the Fed, we do not know where or how those staggering sums were, and are, being used.
(10) After three annual submission-and-review cycles since 2012, it has become clear that the nation's largest banks are still TBTF. (11)
Some have already suggested that California is "too-big-to-fail" (TBTF), and that its economic collapse could dramatically interfere with the economies of neighboring states, regions, the country, or even the world.
Beck (2008) raises the argument that while consolidation has often been justified by efficiency, the process of consolidation and the resulting financial conglomerates have given rise to stability concerns--the size, complexity of these institutions might make it difficult for authorities to intervene and potentially close such institutions, a phenomenon known as too big to fail (TBTF).