TSR

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TSR

 (tē′ĕs-är′)
n.
A program, such as a spell checker or calendar, that remains loaded in memory so that it may be quickly recalled while another program is running, as found in operating systems which do not allow multitasking.

[t(erminate and) s(tay) r(esident).]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

TSR


n., pl. TSRs, TSR's.
a computer program with any of several ancillary functions, usu. held resident in RAM for instant activation while one is using another program.
[t(erminate and) s(tay) r(esident)]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
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| 1977: Tandy Corporation released the TRS-80, one of the first personal computers available to the consumer market.
August 3, 1977--RadioShack introduces its first home computer, the TRS-80. One of the first mass-produced home computers, along with the Apple II and Commodore machines, the TRS-80 featured a full QWERTY keyboard and an internal BASIC interpreter and shipped with 4KB of RAM at a time when many computers came with just 1KB; it could be upgraded to as much as 48KB.
Therefore, next month I will end-of-life my trusty TRS-80 Color Computer.
From the late 1970s to the early 1990s, the recognition of the personal computing market saw early computers like the Radio Shack TRS-80 and Commodore 64 transition into more widespread PC platforms like the Apple Macintosh and Windows-powered PCs.
Three bands, then dive back into the press room, tap out breathless copy on my budget Tandy TRS-80 - Radio Shack, no less - and attach it to a standard BT phone, using the twin suction pads of a hefty modem.
In 1977, the chain started selling the TRS-80, known affectionately by its users as the ''Trash 80,'' making the RadioShack as important in microcomputers as IBM or Apple.
Gradually, guests would be reintroduced to the online world via TRS-80 computers, dial-up modems, walled gardens such as Prodigy or Compuserve, simple electronic games including Pong, and limited-function cellphones the size of bricks.
But what exactly does 4K mean (aside from the stock memory in a Radio Shack TRS-80, for the aging geeks like me in the audience)?
The otherwise-unsuccessful Wang 1200 (1971) broke new ground between typewriters and mainframes; WordStar for the TRS-80 (1979) put word processing onto personal computers, forever shifting responsibility for expressing oneself from a scribe or secretary to one's very own fingers.
My first personal computer, in the early 1980s, was a Radio Shack TRS-80. Despite its incredibly constrained hardware, it provided one of my favorite games, in a genre then referred to as interactive fiction.