TTYL

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Related to TTYS: ICYMI

TTYL

abbreviation for
(Telecommunications) talk to you later
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

TTYL

Talk to you later
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
References in periodicals archive ?
Examples of such policies include time limits on phone calls and the restricted availability of the TTY. While people speak at approximately 150 to 220 words per minute, even the best typists only type about 45 words per minute using standard TTY equipment.
While some facilities provide telephone access during specific hours of the day, deaf offenders often find themselves waiting until the evening, when an officer has time to retrieve the TTY or take them to it.
In New York State, Verizon has aggressively put TTYs into public spaces, including New York City's subway stations and area schools and centers for deaf children and adults.
To launch the program in 1996, Verizon donated dozens of TTYs to New York State's 29 library systems.
* The ADA Information Line, (800) 514-0201 (voice) / 514-0383 (TTY); Spanish language service is also available
Contact: www.eeoc.gov; ADA publications, (800) 669-3362 (voice) / (800) 800-3302 (TTY); ADA questions, (800) 669-4000 (voice) / 669-6820 (TTY).
These operators connect a person using a TTY with a standard phone user.
The current Massachusetts relay number, 1-800-439-2370 for TTY calls and 1-800-439-0183 for voice calls, continues to be available for calls
However, thanks to technology, a very simple device called a TEXTTELEPHONE (there are two recognized abbreviations, TTY and TDD, of which the first is becoming the standard) allows phone communication.
Nevertheless, in the past two decades, many public libraries around the nation have started developing services for "the deaf" by using federal monies, such as are provided under the Library Services and Construction Act (LSCA), to install text telephones (TTY), to establish or expand a collection of books and videotapes about or for deaf people, to provide staff sensitivity training, and to make interpreters or storytellers available for library programs for all ages.
Other names for TTY are "TDD," which stands for "telecommunications devices for the deaf," or, less common, "TT," which stands for "text telephone."