tacit

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tac·it

 (tăs′ĭt)
adj.
1. Not spoken: indicated tacit approval by smiling and winking.
2. Implied by or inferred from actions or statements: Management has given its tacit approval to the plan.
3. Archaic Not speaking; silent.

[Latin tacitus, silent, past participle of tacēre, to be silent.]

tac′it·ly adv.
tac′it·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

tacit

(ˈtæsɪt)
adj
1. implied or inferred without direct expression; understood: a tacit agreement.
2. (Law) created or having effect by operation of law, rather than by being directly expressed
[C17: from Latin tacitus, past participle of tacēre to be silent]
ˈtacitly adv
ˈtacitness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

tac•it

(ˈtæs ɪt)

adj.
1. understood without being openly expressed; implied: tacit approval.
2. silent; saying nothing: a tacit partner.
3. unvoiced or unspoken: a tacit prayer.
[1595–1605; < Latin tacitus silent, past participle of tacēre to be silent]
tac′it•ly, adv.
tac′it•ness, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
tacenda, tacit - Tacenda are things not to be mentioned or made public—things better left unsaid; tacit means "unspoken, silent" or "implied, inferred."
See also related terms for implied.

tacit

- One of its early meanings was "wordless, noiseless," from Latin tacere, "be silent."
See also related terms for silent.
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.tacit - implied by or inferred from actions or statements; "gave silent consent"; "a tacit agreement"; "the understood provisos of a custody agreement"
implicit, inexplicit - implied though not directly expressed; inherent in the nature of something; "an implicit agreement not to raise the subject"; "there was implicit criticism in his voice"; "anger was implicit in the argument"; "the oak is implicit in the acorn"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

tacit

adjective implied, understood, implicit, silent, taken for granted, unspoken, inferred, undeclared, wordless, unstated, unexpressed a tacit admission that a mistake had been made
stated, spoken, explicit, expressed, spelled-out
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

tacit

adjective
2. Conveyed indirectly without words or speech:
Idiom: taken for granted.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
äänetönhiljainen
non-verbaalstilzwijgend

tacit

[ˈtæsɪt] ADJtácito
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

tacit

[ˈtæsɪt] adjtacite
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

tacit

Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

tacit

[ˈtæsɪt] adjtacito/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
Casaubon did not question her further, but he felt sure that she had wished to know what had passed between Lydgate and himself "She knows that I know," said the ever-restless voice within; but that increase of tacit knowledge only thrust further off any confidence between them.
Tacit knowledge acquisition means eliciting tacit knowledge from various knowledge sources and representing it in the right form in order to share the knowledge among organizational members and reuse it [20, 21].
KM literature explains two broad categories of knowledge known as explicit and tacit knowledge (Nonaka and Takeuchi, 1995).
More precisely, due to their long-term orientation and the intimate connection among family members, some family firms are especially adept at accumulating human capital, passing on tacit knowledge, protecting and leveraging reputation, and building strong relationships and slack resources.
Tacit knowledge is significant in the knowledge system of humans and is the core resource in human brains dominating their behaviors [4].
Organizational knowledge and on results tacit knowledge is focused knowledge management.
K2P can help governmental actors make decisions that will positively benefit the public, "by making sure that high quality evidence and tacit knowledge are becoming an integral input into the policymaking process," Jardali said.
The theory of knowledge creation suggests that in socialization conversion of tacit knowledge to tacit knowledge occurs; in externalization tacit knowledge is converted to explicit knowledge; whereas in combination explicit knowledge converts into explicit knowledge; and finally in internalization explicit knowledge gets converted into tacit knowledge [21].
In the first place, what Oakeshott calls "practical knowledge" in his seminal essay "Rationalism in Politics" (1947) seems very similar to what Gascoigne and Thornton, following Polanyi, call tacit knowledge. It would therefore have been interesting to learn how our authors think Oakeshott's views are related both to their own views and to the views of Ryle, Heidegger, Wittgenstein, and Polanyi (whom Oakeshott cites with warm approval in "Rationalism in Politics").
Tacit knowledge is difficult to put into written form; it is occasionally called experiential knowledge.
Intangibles addressed include virtues, professional decision-making, entrepreneurial learning, tacit knowledge, social capital, and reputation.
The well-known SECI model of the knowledge creating process first proposed by Nonaka (1991), describes how explicit and tacit knowledge is generated, transferred, and recreated in organizations.