tacit

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Related to Tacit knowledge: Knowledge Management

tac·it

 (tăs′ĭt)
adj.
1. Not spoken: indicated tacit approval by smiling and winking.
2. Implied by or inferred from actions or statements: Management has given its tacit approval to the plan.
3. Archaic Not speaking; silent.

[Latin tacitus, silent, past participle of tacēre, to be silent.]

tac′it·ly adv.
tac′it·ness n.

tacit

(ˈtæsɪt)
adj
1. implied or inferred without direct expression; understood: a tacit agreement.
2. (Law) created or having effect by operation of law, rather than by being directly expressed
[C17: from Latin tacitus, past participle of tacēre to be silent]
ˈtacitly adv
ˈtacitness n

tac•it

(ˈtæs ɪt)

adj.
1. understood without being openly expressed; implied: tacit approval.
2. silent; saying nothing: a tacit partner.
3. unvoiced or unspoken: a tacit prayer.
[1595–1605; < Latin tacitus silent, past participle of tacēre to be silent]
tac′it•ly, adv.
tac′it•ness, n.
tacenda, tacit - Tacenda are things not to be mentioned or made public—things better left unsaid; tacit means "unspoken, silent" or "implied, inferred."
See also related terms for implied.

tacit

- One of its early meanings was "wordless, noiseless," from Latin tacere, "be silent."
See also related terms for silent.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.tacit - implied by or inferred from actions or statements; "gave silent consent"; "a tacit agreement"; "the understood provisos of a custody agreement"
implicit, inexplicit - implied though not directly expressed; inherent in the nature of something; "an implicit agreement not to raise the subject"; "there was implicit criticism in his voice"; "anger was implicit in the argument"; "the oak is implicit in the acorn"

tacit

adjective implied, understood, implicit, silent, taken for granted, unspoken, inferred, undeclared, wordless, unstated, unexpressed a tacit admission that a mistake had been made
stated, spoken, explicit, expressed, spelled-out

tacit

adjective
2. Conveyed indirectly without words or speech:
Idiom: taken for granted.
Translations
äänetönhiljainen
non-verbaalstilzwijgend

tacit

[ˈtæsɪt] ADJtácito

tacit

[ˈtæsɪt] adjtacite

tacit

tacit

[ˈtæsɪt] adjtacito/a
References in classic literature ?
Casaubon did not question her further, but he felt sure that she had wished to know what had passed between Lydgate and himself "She knows that I know," said the ever-restless voice within; but that increase of tacit knowledge only thrust further off any confidence between them.
The big shift is recognizing how tacit knowledge flows in new types of networks, such as video, social media, augmented reality, and virtual reality.
As opposed to explicit, tacit knowledge is absolutely novel and, for this reason, beneficial for organizations.
Permit users to enhance content, create communities of practice, and share tacit knowledge with integrated social collaboration tools
Handbook of Research on Tacit Knowledge Management for Organizational Success
Kraft Foods would like to know of any knowledge management best practices, approaches, or vendors that can help us capture and share critical tacit knowledge within the R&D organization.
Tacit knowledge (Nonaka and Takeuchi, 1995) is that form of knowledge that people possess in their minds, consisting of sets of past personal experiences.
Holtbrugge and Berg (2004) stated that knowledge transfer, which Kalling (2003) defined as a process in which employees within an organization learn from each other, has two dimensions: explicit knowledge (formal and codified) and tacit knowledge (informal, often culturally based understandings).
Uncertainty, Tacit Knowledge, and Practice Variation: Evidence from Physicians in Training
The transformation from tacit knowledge to explicit knowledge is a challenging task.
KM literature explains two broad categories of knowledge known as explicit and tacit knowledge (Nonaka and Takeuchi, 1995).
More precisely, due to their long-term orientation and the intimate connection among family members, some family firms are especially adept at accumulating human capital, passing on tacit knowledge, protecting and leveraging reputation, and building strong relationships and slack resources.