Tantrayana


Also found in: Wikipedia.
Related to Tantrayana: Vajrayana Buddhism, Tantric Buddhism

Tantrayana

the mixed form of Buddhism practiced in Tibet, adding to ideas from both major Buddhist developments doctrines and practices from Hindu Tantric sects and the native Tibetan religion of nature worship and magic called Bönism; it combines the Hinayana concept of emancipation through self-discipline and the Mahayana concept of philosophical insight into reality for the sake of others with uniquely Tibetan magical rites and mystical meditation. — Tantrayanic, adj.
See also: Buddhism
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Summary: Ladakh [India], June 25 (ANI): Bringing the colorful shades in the barren, the legendary Hemis festival began on Monday in Ladakh, to commemorate the birth anniversary of Guru Padmasambhava, the eight centuries Indian Guru revered for spreading Tantrayana Buddhism throughout the entire Himalayas.
The courtyard of Hemis Gompa, the biggest Buddhist monastery in Ladakh and the headquarters of the Drukpa Order, is the stage for the festival that celebrates the birth anniversary of Guru Padmasambhava, the eighth century Indian guru revered for spreading Tantrayana Buddhism in the
In fact, the first eight chapters, well over half the book, summarize fundamental Mahay ana principles as Yeshe contrasts "sutrayana," a path he criticizes as limited and inferior, to "tantrayana." Because only the last four chapters treat exclusively tantric subjects, the book would be more appropriately titled Introduction to Buddhism from a Tantric Perspective.
As early as the Yuan dynasty, drawing from the theories of reincarnation, Tibetan Buddhist scholars and historians tried to link the Mongolian imperial lineage to Buddhism: one of Chinggis Khan's ancestors, Khorichar-Mergen, they claimed, "was the reincarnation of Padmasambhava, a great master of Tantrayana and founder of the Buddhist faith in Tibet".
the philosophy of "getting enlightened for the benefit of others" and the methods are based on the Tantrayana teachings passed down from the great Indian saint Naropa, who was born in 1016 in West Bengal royal family.
Swat was once the cradle of Buddhism of all of its schools - Mahayana, Hinayana and Tantrayana, where once 1,400 monasteries flourished.
In keeping with Tantrayana classifications, Tibetan masters have devised consecrations of four types--Action (kriya), Performance (carya), Yoga (yoga) and Highest Yoga (anuttara-yoga), a division mostly made from the point of view of their field of emphasis, whether to external, internal or yogic practices, and the levels of deities invoked as the central figure during consecration.
Among Buddhists, approximately 60 percent follow the Mahayana school, Theravada followers account for 30 percent, and the remaining 10 percent belong to the Tantrayana, Tridharma, Kasogatan, Nichiren, and Maitreya schools.
Also called Tantrayana or Vajrayana, it falls within the Mahayana vehicle of Buddhism.
Among Buddhists, approximately 60 percent followed the Mahayana school, Theravada followers accounted for 30 percent, and the remaining 10 percent belonged to the Tantrayana, Tridharma, Kasogatan, Nichiren, and Maitreya schools.
Theravada followers account for another 30 percent, with the remaining 10 percent belonging to the Tantrayana, Tridharma, Kasogatan, Nichiren, and Maitreya schools.