taonga


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taonga

(tɑˈɔnɡə)
n
NZ treasure; anything highly prized
[Māori]
References in periodicals archive ?
2017), "Na Taonga a-iwi ki Taonga Mihini From cultural resource to technology : Northland's geothermal power development at Ngawha Ko te Ngawha te kanohi o te taonga, engari ko tona whatumanawa a, ko tona mana hauora, no raro".
Ahua: Explore relevant taonga and their relationship to identity, relationships and/or connection to Te Ao Maori, including Ta Moko, pounamu etc
On October 4, 2016, the five listed authors came together at Nga Taonga Sound and Vision Film Archive (1) in New Zealand's capital city of Wellington to present a "lecture" in honour of the former Labour Prime Minister Peter Fraser.
Others noted that through visits their children would 'see taonga (treasures) that they can call their own', and could get 'real exposure to Te Ao Maori (the Maori world) at the gallery'.
It is one of several books to be published in the WW100 First World War Centenary History--a partnership between Manatu Taonga Ministry for Culture and Heritage (MCH), New Zealand Defence Force, Massey University and the Returned and Services Association.
Solomon, Maui 2005 'The Wai 262 claim: a claim by Maori to Indigenous flora and fauna--Me o Raataou Taonga Katoa' in M Belgrave, M Merata Kawharu and D Williams (eds), Waitangi revisited: perspectives on the Treaty of Waitangi, Oxford University Press, Melbourne, pp.
According to Facebook, Taonga became a top 100 grossing title within three months.
For Taonga Tu Puoro: Standing Waves in Space, the frequency to be used in the room was found using a tone generator.
CASES heard at Coventry Magistrates Court on Monday, September 7, included: Taonga Chinamulungu, 19, of Mary Slessor Street, Willenhall, admitted driving a vehicle knowing it had been taken without consent, and driving with the wrong licence and no insurance.
28) Given that damage had been caused to a taonga (treasure, i.
In 1999, the Waitangi Tribunal (1999) released The Whanganui River Report, in which it was argued at great length that when the Treaty was signed, the Whanganui River and its tributaries were possessed by the local Maori and revered as a taonga or 'treasure' of special significance.