tapir

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ta·pir

 (tā′pər, tə-pîr′, tā′pîr′)
n.
Any of several large, chiefly nocturnal, odd-toed ungulates of the genus Tapirus of tropical America and Southeast Asia, having a stocky body, short legs, and a fleshy, trunklike proboscis.

[Perhaps French, ultimately from Tupí tapiira, tapir.]

tapir

(ˈteɪpə)
n, pl -pirs or -pir
(Animals) any perissodactyl mammal of the genus Tapirus, such as T. indicus (Malayan tapir), of South and Central America and SE Asia, having an elongated snout, three-toed hind legs, and four-toed forelegs: family Tapiridae
[C18: from Tupi tapiira]

ta•pir

(ˈteɪ pər, təˈpɪər)

n., pl. -pirs, (esp. collectively) -pir.
any stout, hoofed mammal of the genus Tapirus of tropical America and SE Asia, having a short, fleshy proboscis.
[1745–55; « Tupi tapira]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tapir - large inoffensive chiefly nocturnal ungulate of tropical America and southeast Asia having a heavy body and fleshy snouttapir - large inoffensive chiefly nocturnal ungulate of tropical America and southeast Asia having a heavy body and fleshy snout
odd-toed ungulate, perissodactyl, perissodactyl mammal - placental mammals having hooves with an odd number of toes on each foot
genus Tapirus, Tapirus - type genus of the Tapiridae
New World tapir, Tapirus terrestris - a tapir found in South America and Central America
Indian tapir, Malayan tapir, Tapirus indicus - a tapir found in Malaya and Sumatra
Translations
tapir
tapiro
tapiiri
tapiri
tapir
tapir

tapir

[ˈteɪpəʳ] Ntapir m

tapir

nTapir m

tapir

[ˈteɪpəʳ] ntapiro
References in classic literature ?
If we take on the one side, the elephant, [7] hippopotamus, giraffe, bos caffer, elan, certainly three, and probably five species of rhinoceros; and on the American side, two tapirs, the guanaco, three deer, the vicuna, peccari, capybara (after which we must choose from the monkeys to complete the number), and then place these two groups alongside each other, it is not easy to conceive ranks more disproportionate in size.
Near the lower end of the valley I passed a number of tapirs, and across the river saw a great sadok, the enormous double-horned progenitor of the modern rhinoceros.
The common parent will have had in its whole organisation much general resemblance to the tapir and to the horse; but in some points of structure may have differed considerably from both, even perhaps more than they differ from each other.
Well, I interrupted, "any large South American animal--a tapir, for example.
This is not a conceivable bone either of a tapir or of any other creature known to zoology.
All the more did the affairs of the great world interest her, when communicated in the letters of high-born relations: the way in which fascinating younger sons had gone to the dogs by marrying their mistresses; the fine old-blooded idiocy of young Lord Tapir, and the furious gouty humors of old Lord Megatherium; the exact crossing of genealogies which had brought a coronet into a new branch and widened the relations of scandal,--these were topics of which she retained details with the utmost accuracy, and reproduced them in an excellent pickle of epigrams, which she herself enjoyed the more because she believed as unquestionably in birth and no-birth as she did in game and vermin.
Senior keeper Sam Grove, said: "Baby tapirs will drink mum's milk up until they're approximately four months old, when they'll start eating solids.
HUGE new state-of-the-art habitats for sun bears, Malayan tapirs and Asian songbirds have been unveiled at Chester Zoo.
Although few data on the infection by the parasite in tapirs is available, the modified agglutinating test (MAT) has already been used to identify antibodies in captive and free-living individuals of this species (NAVEDA et al.
In 2014 a Telonics[R] telemetry collar (TGW-4570-3 GPS/Gen4 GPS-Iridium collar system) were attached to a young male (> 1 year old) and an adult female lowland tapirs (Tapirus terrestris), in order to monitor their movements.
Malayan tapirs are endangered due to the destruction of their habitat in the forests of their native South East Asia, with fewer than 2,500 in the wild.
Tapirs, however, have four toes on their front hooves and three on their back hooves.