tarantula hawk

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tarantula hawk

n.
Any of various large predatory wasps of the genera Pepsis and Hemipepsis, whose females have a painful sting and provision their nests with a paralyzed tarantula.
References in periodicals archive ?
The tarantula hawk wasp Hemipepsis ustulata is a lek-forming insect whose males defend certain conspicuous shrubs and trees growing on mountain ridges in Arizona, even though these plants provide no resources of utility to males or females (Alcock, 1979, 1981).
Lek territoriality in a tarantula hawk wasp Hemipepsis ustulata (Hymenoptera: Pompilidae).
Hilltopping behaviour and mating success of the tarantula hawk wasp, Hemipepsis ustulata (Hymenoptera: Pompilidae), at a high elevation peak.
Although in 1 y (1998) all figures were higher (except for the average tenure of resident males), in the other 5 y of the study the population of tarantula hawk wasps behaved very similarly, such that the various parameters measured were highly similar from year to year.
Similarity in the distribution of male sizes probably stems from a similar distribution in prey sizes selected by female tarantula hawk wasps from year to year, as the weight of the offspring is almost certainly largely a function of the amount of provisions provided by its mother (Dow, 1942; Klostermeyer et al.
Consistency in the relative attractiveness of a set of landmark territorial sites to two generations of male tarantula hawk wasps (Hymenoptera: Pompilidae).
Success in territorial defence by male tarantula hawk wasps Hemipepsis ustulata: the role of residency.
There are 100,000 species of wasp across the world - from the common yellow jacket to the fearsome tarantula hawk wasp - and 9,000 different types in the UK.
To give you a flavour, the tarantula hawk wasp paralyses a spider, lays eggs inside it and the larvae eat it alive.
The hunting behavior of tarantula hawk wasps of the genus Pepsis (Hymenoptera: Pompilidae) has been a topic of interest in both the popular and scientific literature since the early descriptions of Petrunkevitch (1926) and Passmore (1936).