Tarzan


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Tarzan

(ˈtɑːzən)
n
(sometimes not capital) informal often ironic a man with great physical strength, agility, and virility
[C20: after the hero of a series of stories by Edgar Rice Burroughs]

Tar•zan

(ˈtɑr zən, -zæn)
Trademark.
the hero of a series of jungle stories by Edgar Rice Burroughs, exemplifying superior physical strength, agility, and prowess.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Tarzan - (sometimes used ironically) a man of great strength and agility (after the hero of a series of novels by Edgar Rice Burroughs)Tarzan - (sometimes used ironically) a man of great strength and agility (after the hero of a series of novels by Edgar Rice Burroughs)
adult male, man - an adult person who is male (as opposed to a woman); "there were two women and six men on the bus"
2.Tarzan - a man raised by apes who was the hero of a series of novels by Edgar Rice Burroughs
Translations

Tarzan

[ˈtɑːzən] NTarzán
References in classic literature ?
Or at least so thought Tarzan of the Apes, who squatted upon a low-swinging branch in a near-by tree and looked down upon her.
Lost to Tarzan of the Apes was the truth of his origin.
Cold and uncomfortable--it was a savage Tarzan who threaded the mazes of the soggy jungle.
When the sun shone again upon the second day and a wide, open plain let the full heat of Kudu flood the chilled, brown body, Tarzan's spirits rose; but it was still a sullen, surly brute that moved steadily onward into the south where he hoped again to pick up the trail of the Germans.
As the warriors, clustered thick about Tarzan and Sheeta, realized that it was a flesh-and-blood panther that had interrupted their dance of death, they took heart a trifle, for in the face of all those circling spears even the mighty Sheeta would be doomed.
Rokoff was urging the chief to have his spearmen launch their missiles, and the black was upon the instant of issuing the command, when his eyes strayed beyond Tarzan, following the gaze of the ape-man.
It was not until late the following afternoon that Tarzan saw anything more of the fellow passengers into the midst of whose affairs his love of fair play had thrust him.
They were standing on deck at a point which was temporarily deserted, and as Tarzan came upon them they were in heated argument with a woman.
Tarzan was eyeing the man and the woman, a puzzled expression in his eyes, but there was no faintest tinge of recognition.
"Tarzan!" she exclaimed, and then, in the vernacular of the great apes which constant association with the anthropoids had rendered the common language of the Oparians: "You have come back to me!
It was a well-laden Tarzan who dropped from the branches into the midst of the tribe of Kerchak.
In his little evil brain he sought for some excuse to wreak his hatred upon Tarzan.