Tartary

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Tar·ta·ry

 (tär′tə-rē) or Ta·ta·ry (tä′-)
A vast region of eastern Europe and northern Asia controlled by the Mongols in the 1200s and 1300s. It extended as far east as the Pacific Ocean under the rule of Genghis Khan.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Tartary

(ˈtɑːtərɪ)
n
(Placename) a variant spelling of Tatary
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Ta•ta•ry

(ˈtɑ tə ri)

also Tartary



n.
a historic region of indefinite extent in E Europe and Asia: designates the area overrun by the Tartars in the Middle Ages, from the Dnieper River to the Pacific.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Tartary - the vast geographical region of Europe and Asia that was controlled by the Mongols in the 13th and 14th centuries; "under Genghis Khan Tartary extended as far east as the Pacific Ocean"
Asia - the largest continent with 60% of the earth's population; it is joined to Europe on the west to form Eurasia; it is the site of some of the world's earliest civilizations
Europe - the 2nd smallest continent (actually a vast peninsula of Eurasia); the British use `Europe' to refer to all of the continent except the British Isles
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

Tartary

[ˈtɑːtərɪ] NTartaria f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

Tartary

nTatarei f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
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References in periodicals archive ?
Epidemic diseases that are associated with famine offer a way to document how widely famine had spread, and in April-June 1933, "an epidemic of typhus struck the industrial zones of Ukraine, the Central Black-Earth region, the lower and central Volga, the North Caucasus, the Urals, Kazakhstan, and Central Asia, as well as Gorkovskii Krai, Tataria, Bashkiria, and Yakutia." (9) Kondrashin also notes sharp declines in food availability and increased mortality rates in many Soviet cities and provinces.
They propagated Crambe tataria, an "endangered species" in Italy, in order to protect them under ex situ conditions.
He moved to Tataria, where he worked on the construction of the "KamAZ" (Kama Car Plant) in a carpentry and concrete brigade.
About Balakhany tier as the part of Tataria Pliocene // News of USSR AS Kazan Branch.
(76.) Tataria M, Quarto N, Longaker MT, Sylvester KG.
Peng PD, Spain DA, Tataria M, Hellinger JC, Rubin GD, Brundage ST.
It includes a huge 1711 panorama of Moscow, a 1656 map showing "the procession of Muscovites," a 1662 map of the north Dvina River, described as the only waterway into Muscovite; and two rare 1570 and 1606 maps of Tataria, or Tatar, basically the Mongol Empire.
tataria in Turkey (Korotyaev & Gultekin 2003; Gultekin 2007).