spectator

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spec·ta·tor

 (spĕk′tā′tər)
n.
An observer of an event, especially a sports contest.

[Latin spectātor, from spectāre, to watch; see spectacle.]

spec′ta·to′ri·al (-tə-tôr′ē-əl) adj.
spec′ta·tor·ship′ n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

spectator

(spɛkˈteɪtə)
n
a person viewing anything; onlooker; observer
[C16: from Latin, from spectāre to watch; see spectacle]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

spec•ta•tor

(ˈspɛk teɪ tər, spɛkˈteɪ-)

n.
1. a person who looks on or watches; onlooker; observer.
2. a member of the audience at a public spectacle, display, or the like.
3. Also called spec′tator shoe`. a white shoe with a wing tip and various trims, often perforated, in a contrasting color.
[1580–90; < Latin spectātor <spectā(re), frequentative of specere to look]
spec`ta•to′ri•al (-təˈtɔr i əl, -ˈtoʊr-) adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.spectator - a close observerspectator - a close observer; someone who looks at something (such as an exhibition of some kind); "the spectators applauded the performance"; "television viewers"; "sky watchers discovered a new star"
beholder, observer, perceiver, percipient - a person who becomes aware (of things or events) through the senses
browser - a viewer who looks around casually without seeking anything in particular
bystander - a nonparticipant spectator
cheerer - a spectator who shouts encouragement
eyewitness - a spectator who can describe what happened
gawker - a spectator who stares stupidly without intelligent awareness
motion-picture fan, moviegoer - someone who goes to see movies
ogler - a viewer who gives a flirtatious or lewd look at another person
looker-on, onlooker - someone who looks on
playgoer, theatergoer, theatregoer - someone who attends the theater
rubbernecker, rubberneck - a person who stares inquisitively
spy - a secret watcher; someone who secretly watches other people; "my spies tell me that you had a good time last night"
starer - a viewer who gazes fixedly (often with hostility)
peeper - a viewer who enjoys seeing the sex acts or sex organs of others
2.spectator - a woman's pump with medium heel; usually in contrasting colors for toe and heel
pump - a low-cut shoe without fastenings
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

spectator

Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

spectator

noun
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
مُتَفَرِّجمُشَاهِد
divák
tilskuer
katsoja
promatrač
megfigyelő
áhorfandi
観客
관중
būti žiūrovu
skatītājs
gledalec
åskådare
ผู้ชม
khán giả

spectator

[spekˈteɪtəʳ]
A. Nespectador(a) m/f spectatorspúblico msing
B. CPD spectator sport Ndeporte m espectáculo
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

spectator

[spɛkˈteɪtər] nspectateur/trice m/fspectator sport nsport m spectacle
I don't like spectator sports → Je n'aime pas les sports spectacles.
Football is a great spectator sport → Le football est un grand sport spectacle.
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

spectator

nZuschauer(in) m(f)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

spectator

[spɛkˈteɪtəʳ] nspettatore/trice
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

spectator

(spekˈteitə) , ((American) ˈspekteitər) noun
a person who watches (an event). Fifty thousand spectators came to the match.
specˈtate verb
to be a spectator (at an event).
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

spectator

مُشَاهِد divák tilskuer Zuschauer θεατής espectador katsoja spectateur promatrač spettatore 観客 관중 toeschouwer tilskuer widz espectador зритель åskådare ผู้ชม izleyici khán giả 观众
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
References in classic literature ?
The Tatler, like Defoe's Review, was a leaflet of two or three pages, published three times a week.
Steele meant the Tatler to be a newspaper in which one might find all the news of the day, but he also meant it to be something more.
The Tatler, especially after Addison joined with Steele in producing it, was a great success.
Addison and Steele carried on the Tatler for two years, then it was stopped to make way for a far more famous paper called the Spectator.
The Spectator was still further from the ordinary newspaper than the Tatler. It was more perhaps what our modern magazines are meant to be, but, instead of being published once a week or once a month, it was published every morning.
In order to give interest to the paper, instead of dating the articles from various coffee-houses, as had been done in the Tatler, Addison and Steele between them imagined a club.
In this confinement he began The Review , a newspaper which he continued for eleven years and whose department called 'The Scandal Club' suggested 'The Tatler' to Steele.
STEELE AND ADDISON AND 'THE TATLER' AND 'THE SPECTATOR' The writings of Steele and Addison, of which the most important are their essays in 'The Tatler' and 'The Spectator,' contrast strongly with the work of Swift and are more broadly characteristic of the pseudo-classical period.
"Suddenly and quietly the whole human race is brought within speaking and hearing distance," it exclaimed; "scarcely anything was more desired and more impossible." The next paper to quit the mob of scoffers was the Tatler, which said in an editorial peroration, "We cannot but feel im- pressed by the picture of a human child commanding the subtlest and strongest force in Nature to carry, like a slave, some whisper around the world."
THE GUARDIAN; THE TATLER; Richardson's PAMELA; Mackenzie's MAN OF FEELING; Roscoe's LORENZO DE MEDICI; and Robertson's CHARLES THE FIFTH--all classical works; all (of course) immeasurably superior to anything produced in later times; and all (from my present point of view) possessing the one great merit of enchaining nobody's interest, and exciting nobody's brain.
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Since 2016, Philippine Tatler has unveiled the annual Generation T list--the authority on under-40 industry leaders who are creating waves in their respective fields.