tattletale

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tat·tle·tale

 (tăt′l-tāl′)
n.
One who tattles on others; an informer or talebearer.
adj.
Revealing; telltale.

tattletale

(ˈtætəlˌteɪl)
n
1. a scandalmonger or gossip
2. another word for telltale1

tat•tle•tale

(ˈtæt lˌteɪl)

n.
1. a talebearer or informer, esp. among children.
adj.
2. telltale; revealing: tattletale crumbs.
[1885–90]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tattletale - someone who gossips indiscreetlytattletale - someone who gossips indiscreetly  
gossiper, gossipmonger, newsmonger, rumormonger, rumourmonger, gossip - a person given to gossiping and divulging personal information about others

tattletale

noun
1. A person habitually engaged in idle talk about others:
Slang: yenta.
2. One who gives incriminating information about others:
Informal: rat, tipster.
Translations

tattletale

[ˈtætlteɪl] N (US) (= person) → soplón/ona m/f, acusica mf (Sp) ; (= talk) → cotilleo m, chismes mpl y cuentos mpl
References in periodicals archive ?
Teachers are bragging that they are her tattletales as they walk around doing whatever they want because they don't have to worry about being targeted.
And where virtue-signalling tattletales are celebrated.
See also Lisa Austin Technological Tattletales and Constitutional Black Holes: Communications Intermediaries and Constitutional Constraints, 17 THEORETICAL INQUIRIES L.
When mentor teachers are seen as trusted members of a support team--and not as tattletales, playing "gotcha" with their mentees -- then they can serve effectively as liaisons.
Our kid's aversions to being tattletales, talking to adults about a problem, or letting the hidden on social media come to light had caused a silence and inaction that cost two young girls lives.
But public perception can also feed off of a natural distaste for tattletales, leading to distrust and a perception that whistleblowers report for selfish, destructive reasons." Interviews on the subject indicate that the public is inconsistent in its evaluation of whistleblowers.
However, requiring the police report incidents that hurt others' feelings is a waste of police resources, and tends to remind one of the teary-eyed tattletales in grade school.
According to a mole, AU has been spreading all sorts of unsavory tattletales about SP.
According to trusted celebrity real estate tattletales Hal E.
The scold's bridle (or brank's bridle, or branks) is an artifact we now see on display in museums, but from the sixteenth to the nineteenth centuries in Europe (England, Wales, Germany, and Scotland) it was used to punish women who had a lashing, scathing tongue, to punish chatterboxes, gossips, busybodies, yentas, yakety yaks, nags, harpies, shrews, vixens, quibblers, spitfires, hags, magpies, blabbermouths, loudmouths, prattlers, tattletales, hawkers, fussbudgets, floozies ...
We're going to Goosebumps, Tattletales and The Pink Pony.
Children learn that no one loves a tattletale, and whistleblowers can be seen as the tattletales of the business world, so there is a very real threat of retaliation against those individuals who point out wrongdoing.