deduction

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de·duc·tion

 (dĭ-dŭk′shən)
n.
1. The act of deducting; subtraction.
2. An amount that is or may be deducted: tax deductions.
3. The drawing of a conclusion by reasoning; the act of deducing.
4. Logic
a. The process of reasoning in which a conclusion follows necessarily from the stated premises; inference by reasoning from the general to the specific.
b. A conclusion reached by this process.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

deduction

(dɪˈdʌkʃən)
n
1. (Mathematics) the act or process of deducting or subtracting
2. (Accounting & Book-keeping) something, esp a sum of money, that is or may be deducted
3. (Logic)
a. the process of reasoning typical of mathematics and logic, whose conclusions follow necessarily from their premises
b. an argument of this type
c. the conclusion of such an argument
4. (Logic) logic
a. a systematic method of deriving conclusions that cannot be false when the premises are true, esp one amenable to formalization and study by the science of logic
b. an argument of this type. Compare induction4
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

de•duc•tion

(dɪˈdʌk ʃən)

n.
1. the process of deducting; subtraction.
2. something that may be deducted.
3. the act or process of deducing.
4. something that is deduced.
5.
a. a process of reasoning in which a conclusion follows necessarily from the premises presented; inference from the general to the particular.
b. a conclusion reached by this process. Compare induction (def. 3).
[1400–50; < Latin]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

de·duc·tion

(dĭ-dŭk′shən)
1. The process of reasoning in which a conclusion follows necessarily from the premises; reasoning from the general to the specific.
2. A conclusion reached by this process.
Usage The logical processes known as deduction and induction work in opposite ways. When you use deduction, you apply general principles to specific instances. Thus, using a mathematical formula to figure the volume of air that can be contained in a gymnasium is applying deduction. Similarly, you use deduction when applying a law of physics to predict the outcome of an experiment. By contrast, when you use induction, you examine a number of specific instances of something and make a generalization based on them. Thus, if you observe hundreds of examples in which a certain chemical kills plants, you might conclude by induction that the chemical is toxic to all plants. Inductive generalizations are often revised as more examples are studied and more facts are known. Certain plants that you have not tested, for instance, may turn out to be unaffected by the chemical, and you might have to revise your thinking. In this way, an inductive generalization is much like a hypothesis.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.deduction - a reduction in the gross amount on which a tax is calculateddeduction - a reduction in the gross amount on which a tax is calculated; reduces taxes by the percentage fixed for the taxpayer's income bracket
tax benefit, tax break - a tax deduction that is granted in order to encourage a particular type of commercial activity
business deduction - tax write-off for expenses of doing business
exemption - a deduction allowed to a taxpayer because of his status (having certain dependents or being blind or being over 65 etc.); "additional exemptions are allowed for each dependent"
write-down, write-off - (accounting) reduction in the book value of an asset
2.deduction - an amount or percentage deducted
allowance, adjustment - an amount added or deducted on the basis of qualifying circumstances; "an allowance for profit"
trade discount - a discount from the list price of a commodity allowed by a manufacturer or wholesaler to a merchant
3.deduction - something that is inferred (deduced or entailed or implied); "his resignation had political implications"
illation, inference - the reasoning involved in drawing a conclusion or making a logical judgment on the basis of circumstantial evidence and prior conclusions rather than on the basis of direct observation
4.deduction - reasoning from the general to the particular (or from cause to effect)
abstract thought, logical thinking, reasoning - thinking that is coherent and logical
syllogism - deductive reasoning in which a conclusion is derived from two premises
5.deduction - the act of subtracting (removing a part from the whole); "he complained about the subtraction of money from their paychecks"
reduction, step-down, diminution, decrease - the act of decreasing or reducing something
bite - a portion removed from the whole; "the government's weekly bite from my paycheck"
withholding - the act of deducting from an employee's salary
6.deduction - the act of reducing the selling price of merchandisededuction - the act of reducing the selling price of merchandise
reduction, step-down, diminution, decrease - the act of decreasing or reducing something
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

deduction

noun
1. conclusion, finding, verdict, judgment, assumption, inference, corollary It was a pretty astute deduction.
2. reasoning, thinking, thought, reason, analysis, logic, cogitation, ratiocination 'How did you guess?' 'Deduction,' he replied.
3. discount, reduction, cut, concession, allowance, decrease, rebate, diminution your gross income, before tax and insurance deductions
4. subtraction, reduction, allowance, concession the deduction of tax at 20%
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

deduction

noun
1. An amount deducted:
2. A position arrived at by reasoning from premises or general principles:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
إستِخْلاص، إسْتِنْتاجخَصْم، حَسْمنَتيجَه
dedukcesrážka
fradragslutningudledelseudledning
deduktiopäätelmäpäättelyvähennys
afleiîslafrádráttur
dedukcia
avdraghärledningslutledningslutsats

deduction

[dɪˈdʌkʃən] N
1. (= inference) → deducción f, conclusión f
what are your deductions?¿cuáles son sus conclusiones?
2. (= act of deducting) → deducción f; (= amount deducted) → descuento m
tax deductionsdesgravaciones fpl fiscales, deducciones fpl fiscales
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

deduction

[dɪˈdʌkʃən] n
[points, amount] → déduction f
[tax, interest] → prélèvement m, retenue f
(amount subtracted)prélèvement m
(= conclusion) → déduction f, conclusion f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

deduction

n
(= act of deducting)Abziehen nt, → Abzug m; (= sth deducted, from price) → Nachlass m (→ from für, auf +acc); (from wage) → Abzug m
(= act of deducing)Folgern nt, → Folgerung f; (= sth deduced)(Schluss)folgerung f; (Logic) → Deduktion f; by a process of deductiondurch Folgern
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

deduction

[dɪˈdʌkʃn] n
a. (inference) → deduzione f
b. (subtraction) → detrazione f; (from wages) → trattenuta
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

deduce

(diˈdjuːs) verb
to work out from facts one knows or guesses. From the height of the sun I deduced that it was about ten o'clock.
deduction (diˈdakʃən) noun
1. the act of deducing.
2. something that has been deduced. Is this deduction accurate?

deduct

(diˈdakt) verb
to subtract; to take away. They deducted the expenses from his salary.
deˈduction (-ʃən) noun
something that has been deducted. There were a lot of deductions from my salary this month.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

de·duc·tion

n. deducción.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
(This assumes the company's payroll is sufficient for all principal payments on the ESOP loan to be tax deductible.) At the same time, the new owners are assured a smooth transition.
At the same time, assessments are not tax deductible, adding to the after-tax cost for individual homeowners.
Not all mortgage interest is created equal--or tax deductible. The IRS divides mortgage debt into two categories: (1) acquisition debt, which is debt used to purchase or substantially improve your home, and (2) home equity debt, defined as debt secured by your residence but used for some other purpose.
Since amortization is not tax deductible, it has no direct cash-flow impact.
Therefore, the maximum penalty, which is not tax deductible, is 35 percent.
While the extra depreciation and lower gain recognition can produce tax benefits, amortization of goodwill is never tax deductible and the goodwill element usually is far larger than the first two factors.
The cash dividends on the stock held by the ESOP are tax deductible by the sponsor because they are either used by the ESOP to service its debt or paid to participants.
Acquisition indebtedness may create tax deductible interest on repair of a home destroyed by a casualty.
And for the business owner able to set aside larger amounts, a defined benefit plan--either a corporate retirement plan or a Keogh plan--still can produce a substantial annual tax deductible investment.
Los Angeles, CA, October 25, 2017 --(PR.com)-- Tax deductible limits for traditional long-term care insurance premiums paid in 2018 have been increased according to the American Association for Long-Term Care Insurance.
Each aspect is covered in detail and readers learn how much their tax deductible is.