tax cut

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Noun1.tax cut - the act of reducing taxation; "the new administration's large tax cut was highly controversial"
cut - the act of reducing the amount or number; "the mayor proposed extensive cuts in the city budget"
Translations
détente fiscale
References in periodicals archive ?
Among Americans overall, slightly more (45%) think the tax-cut extension should be temporary than say it should be permanent (37%).
these tax-cut extensions would add up to over $5 trillion (Table 1).
This year, the movement to impose limits on state taxes using ballot initiatives (known as Taxpayer Bill of Rights or TABOR), failed in three states once voters--who appear to have become skeptical of tax-cut gimmicks and free-lunch promises--understood the consequences.
The bill "accelerates all of the child tax credit and marriage penalty relief provisions for the 2001 tax-cut legislation that benefit middle and upper income families, while failing to accelerate either" for low and moderate income working families.
The $330 billion price tag on the tax-cut legislation is deceptive.
Grassley defended the Republican tax-cut proposal against complaints that it favored wealthy Americans.
In fact, the CBO's figures indicate that in the last four months of this fiscal year some $20 billion will be siphoned from the Medicare trust fund to cover the first-year cost of President Bush's tax-cut plan.
But after winning several tax-cut measures in 1999 and 2000, prospects for further cuts this year are cloudy.
he talked up his tax-cut plan, while the Democrats, who oppose the plan, stood by expression-less.
Defenders of the recent tax-cut deal between President Clinton and the GOP contend that Republicans could have achieved nothing better with their slim majority in Congress and a Democrat occupying the White House.
Enough Democrats caved in to Bush on his tax-cut proposals to make them law.
One probable tax-cut vehicle is the upcoming minimum-wage-increase bill, to which business lobbies have a long wish list of expensive tax breaks they want to attach.