Taylorism

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Taylorism

the methods of scientific factory management first introduced in the early 19th century by the American engineer Frederick W. Taylor, especially the differential piece-rate system.
See also: Work
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Translations
Taylorismus
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Meanwhile, the global system of production and distribution is now progressing from the Fordist Taylorist development model to one based on Innovation-Mediated Production.
125) In this way, operators were produced according the Taylorist approaches of body optimization according to particular rhythms.
These changes included increasing automation and Taylorist segmentation of work.
(21) Taylorist managerialism involves undermining not only craftsmanship, but also professionalism in work and all that is involved in this.
Hence my interest in socialist competition, an arena and a discursive field in which self-organized production communes were confronted by "the imperatives of industrialization"; the ambiguous role of foremen in an increasingly Taylorist industrial system; and Stakhanovism.
The distinction between both lies in that precariousness alludes to a quality standard, while atypical work refers to a job related to subsumption forms of the workforce tied to the Taylorist production stage and a modernity that promised progress through social integration by means of salaried work, that is, when job flexibility and the services economy were still in their infancy.
Generally, McDonough's emphasis on the artists and theorists of the SI and Fluxus seems reasonable, and Marxist reckonings with (and challenges to) Fordist and Taylorist assembly-line production understandably relevant--especially in light of the print and celluloid productions of Warhol's factory.
Multi-skilling and multi-tasking and job variation also has made it possible for Japanese producers to overcome the alienation of Taylorist single tasking which was so great for Ford that although offering $5 a day, which was unprecedented at the time, and also profit sharing if workers would stay for 6 months, the pressure of such single tasking, well parodied by Charlie Chaplin in his Modern Times, was such that the turnover during its first year at his Highland Park plant for the Model T was equivalent to its total initial labour force.
This amounted to an attempt "to transform the workplace into a space of leisure, of hijinks and of fun and games, often at the expense of supervisors or workers lacking acculturation to unionism." (115) Such behaviour "connected with male oppositional and confrontational rituals and displays of power to challenge the newly established Taylorist and Fordist industrial order." (116) The strength of the research in the book is the use of grievance files to cast a light on what was actually going on every day in auto plants, in spite of frequent disapproval from the union leadership.
In common with the Taylorist method of production management, the thinking and planning work of the penitentiary institution is restricted to a small group, expecting the majority to execute the delegated activities, with a clear division between those who plan and those who execute.
The Indian manager still believes in a Taylorist ethos that the Indian worker needs to be controlled for the organization to be productive.