Sun Yat-sen

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Sun Yat-sen

 (so͝on′ yät′sĕn′) 1866-1925.
Chinese politician who was elected provisional president of the republic after the fall of the Qing Dynasty (1911). He relinquished the presidency to Yuan Shikai (1912) but later opposed him and formed a military government in southern China.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Sun Yat-sen

(ˈsʊn ˈjɑːtˈsɛn)
n
(Biography) 1866–1925, Chinese statesman, who was instrumental in the overthrow of the Manchu dynasty and was the first president of the Republic of China (1911). He reorganized the Kuomintang
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Sun Yat-sen

(ˈsʊn ˈyɑtˈsɛn)
n.
1866–1925, Chinese political and revolutionary leader.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Sun Yat-sen - Chinese statesman who organized the Kuomintang and led the revolution that overthrew the Manchu dynasty in 1911 and 1912 (1866-1925)Sun Yat-sen - Chinese statesman who organized the Kuomintang and led the revolution that overthrew the Manchu dynasty in 1911 and 1912 (1866-1925)
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References in periodicals archive ?
Hsu Te-ming, a cultural affairs official at Taiwan's representative office in Russia, said the office has organized three Taiwan printmaking events in Moscow and Samara.
For instance, Yu generally accepts at face value anything that he reads in any of the "standard histories." For instance, he summarizes the Chiu T'ang shu biography of another early-T'ang Chuangtzu scholar, the little-known Lu Te-ming, and raises no eyebrows at its report that Lu "found himself dearly appreciated" when attending lectures at the Ch'en court, or even its report that Lu wore hemp clothes to court.
Taipei City mayor Ko Wen-je and KMT official Tang Te-ming have come to heads over the ban on food imports from Japan's Fukushima and surrounding prefectures.