tea tree

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tea tree

n.
1. A melaleuca tree (Melaleuca alternifolia) of Australia whose leaves yield an oil used in cosmetics and for medicinal purposes.
2. Any of various evergreen shrubs or small trees of the genus Leptospermum, native to Southeast Asia and Australasia, having showy flowers and small needlelike leaves formerly used to make a tealike beverage.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

tea tree

n
(Plants) any of various myrtaceous trees of the genus Leptospermum, of Australia and New Zealand, that yield an oil used as an antiseptic
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

tea′ tree`


n.
a tall shrub or small tree, Leptospermum scoparium, of the myrtle family, native to New Zealand and Australia.
[1750–60; so called from the use of its leaves as an infusion]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations
Teebaum
References in periodicals archive ?
Over the last couple of decades the invasion of Coast Tea-tree Leptospermum laevigatum into heathland vegetation has become a significant concern for the Friends of Wonthaggi Heathland, volunteers who care for the heathland and work closely with Parks Victoria.
Coast Tea-tree develops as a small, single-stemmed tree reaching a height of 8-12 m, with a life span of 100-150 years.
Invasion of Coast Tea-tree into heathland shows a variety of effects caused by fire.
In 2000, a trial program of management of the reserve was implemented using slash and burn in small areas of vegetation, with the aims: to assess the invasion of Coast Tea-tree, to determine the effect of each treatment on species richness and to observe the response of individual species of weeds and orchids where appropriate.