Teache

(tēch)
n.1.(Sugar Manuf.) Any one of the series of boilers or evaporating pans in which the cane juice is concentrated in making sugar; especially, the last boiler of the series.
2.
References in classic literature ?
So you see it teaches me also, and is as good as a general review of what I've learned, in a pleasanter way than going over it alone.
My understanding is at length restored, and teaches no less to abhor the artifices which had subdued me than to despise myself for the weakness on which their strength was founded.
But there is another part of the indictment which says that he teaches men not to receive the gods whom the city receives, and has other new gods.
He is poor and they are rich; his profession that he teaches nothing is opposed to their readiness to teach all things; his talking in the marketplace to their private instructions; his tarry-at-home life to their wandering from city to city.
The art of war teaches us to rely not on the likelihood of the enemy's not coming, but on our own readiness to receive him; not on the chance of his not attacking, but rather on the fact that we have made our position unassailable.
It also teaches us, in its application to the United States, how little the rights of a feeble government are likely to be respected, even by its own constituents.
I've yet to hear anyone who teaches a course that blends in technology share a description of such a glowing moment during the technology phases of their courses and very few during the face-to-face phases.
Now Hanlon teaches MBA students seven weeks each year and devotes the rest of her time to research.
Pope John Paul II teaches that married couples who have recourse to the natural regulation of fertility might do so without valid reasons (General Audience, August 8, 1984).
Jen Miller, who teaches ninth-grade biology in Dover, sees no conflict between evolution and religion.
When the pope teaches infallibly, very specific conditions must be met.